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Author Topic: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE  (Read 6964 times)

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Offline moonstreet

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Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« on: October 09, 2012, 09:37:38 PM »
http://www.vanityfair.com/online/oscars/2012/10/michael-jackson-burial-delayed-janet-jackson-deposit

Michael Jackson’s Burial Was Delayed Because Janet Wanted Her Burial-Plot Deposit Back
by Vanity Fair 4:33 PM, OCTOBER 9 2012


Michael Jackson’s burial was delayed due to wrangling between Janet Jackson and her brother’s estate, a detail revealed in a November Vanity Fair–exclusive excerpt of Untouchable, Randall Sullivan’s Michael Jackson biography, which will be published next month. According to Sullivan, Janet put up the $40,000 deposit at Forest Lawn to secure a spot for Michael but refused to let the funeral take place until the money was repaid.

Ronald Williams, of Talon Executive Services—a private-security company that dispatched a team to Michael Jackson’s rented château in Holmby Hills on the night of his death—tells Sullivan that hours after Jackson died, La Toya and her boyfriend, Jeffre Phillips, arrived at the house demanding to be admitted. “We’re family and we should have access to the house,” they reportedly said.

Sullivan reports that mother Katherine Jackson also arrived that night and entered the house, where she telephoned Grace Rwaramba, the recently terminated longtime nanny to Michael’s children. According to Rwaramba, Katherine said, “Grace, the children are crying. They are asking about you. They can’t believe that their father died. Grace, you remember Michael used to hide cash at the house? I’m here. Where can it be?” Rwaramba described Michael’s standard practice of hiding his cash in black plastic garbage bags and under the carpets. Talon describes seeing La Toya and her boyfriend loading black plastic garbage bags into duffel bags and placing them in the garage. (La Toya would insist that nearly all of Michael’s money was gone by the time she arrived at the Holmby Hills house.)

The next morning, Janet Jackson arrived with a moving van and demanded to be admitted. A few hours later, the truck exited through the front gate with Jeffre Phillips at the wheel. Katherine Jackson and her daughters made it clear that they wouldn’t be leaving anytime soon. “They camped out for most of a week,” Williams tells Sullivan, leaving and returning “whenever they felt like it.”

Katherine Jackson’s representatives shared details of her recent “abduction” with Sullivan, who describes what happened from her perspective for the first time. One of Katherine Jackson’s representatives tells Sullivan that it was Janet Jackson who on July 14, 2012, arranged for Dr. Allen Metzger to go to the Calabasas mansion, where her mother had been living with Michael’s three children. Metzger was introduced as an associate of Mrs. Jackson’s longtime Beverly Hills physician and told that her doctor wanted her to have a physical before she went to Albuquerque for her sons’ Unity Tour. After a brief examination, Metzger told Katherine Jackson that her blood pressure was elevated and that it would be best for her not to make the trip to New Mexico by car as she had planned. Katherine left the next morning with her daughter Rebbie and her granddaughter Stacee Brown and Mrs. Jackson’s personal assistant. It wasn’t until they arrived at the airport that Katherine realized they weren’t headed to Albuquerque but rather to Tucson, where she was booked at the Miraval Resort & Spa. Janet Jackson was there when she arrived.

The representative tells Sullivan that Dr. Metzger had no association with Mrs. Jackson’s physician and that she had not sent him to see Mrs. Jackson. Dr. Metzger was, in fact, the same doctor who had been called as a defense witness at the trial of Conrad Murray, the physician convicted of providing the drugs that killed Michael Jackson. He had also been reprimanded by the state medical board for writing prescriptions for Janet Jackson under false or fictitious names.

Katherine’s grandson T. J. Jackson, and others who were looking after Michael’s children at his Calabasas home, soon deduced that the five Jackson siblings—who that same week had sent a letter to Michael’s executors asking them to resign and claiming that their mother had suffered a mini-stroke—now reportedly with Katherine in their custody were, in the view of Mrs. Jackson’s representatives, attempting to gain a conservatorship over her, possibly by demonstrating her incompetence to serve as guardian of Michael’s children. They hoped to gain control of their brother’s fortune, which would follow Prince, Paris, and Blanket wherever they went.

Sullivan explores the question of how John Branca, a lawyer who was fired by Michael Jackson in 2003—and is now earning tens of millions of dollars as an executor of the Michael Jackson estate—managed to retain possession of a will he should have handed over with all of Jackson’s papers to a new attorney, David LeGrand, who turned the documents over to another attorney, Brian Oxman, when he was dismissed. “I had access to every file and I had to go through them,” Oxman recalls. “And I did. There was no will. There was no trust. It just showed up after he died.” (Branca, through his attorney, declined to comment.)

John Branca, has said that the will he presented to the Jacksons in July 2009 was greeted by the family with applause, but Katherine Jackson remembers the meeting differently. “According to her, the atmosphere went from quiet to glum,” Sullivan reports. “She personally was offended that John Branca never once said how sorry he was for her loss. The man was cold, Mrs. Jackson thought, just as Michael had described him: ‘My son had told me and the kids that he never wanted Branca to be any part of his business ever again.’”
« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 10:11:09 AM by moonstreet »

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2012, 09:53:28 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/04/michael-jacksons-burial-delayed-three-months-family-fights-new-book_n_1939445.html

Michael Jackson's Burial Delayed For 3 Months Because Of Family Feuds & Greed, Claims New Book
Posted: 10/04/2012 1:03 pm EDT Updated: 10/04/2012 2:26 pm EDT


In his new book "Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson," author Randall Sullivan reveals new insights into the dysfunction and greed ingrained in the Jackson family, and the ugliness that ensued after Michael's death in 2009.

A Vanity Fair adaptation of Sullivan's book reveals that Michael's burial was delayed for nearly three months due to arguments between his estate and his sister Janet Jackson, 46. Sullivan writes that Janet put down a $40,000 deposit to secure her deceased brother a spot at Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks & Mortuaries in Glendale, Calif., but refused to allow the funeral to take place until the money was repaid to her.

More stories of greed emerge, as Sullivan writes that when a private security company was dispatched to Michael's home on the night he died, La Toya and her boyfriend, Jeffre Phillips showed up hours later demanding they be allowed inside. The pop star's mother, Katherine, also arrived that night and was admitted to the home, where she called Grace Rwaramba, the recently terminated longtime nanny to Michael’s children, and asked her if she knew where her son used to hide his money.

Rwaramba said the singer typically hid cash in black plastic garbage bags and under the carpets, and according to security staff member Ronald Williams, he recalls seeing La Toya and Phillips loading black plastic garbage bags into duffel bags and placing them in the garage -- though La Toya claims that all of her brother's money was gone by the time she arrived at his home.

Sullivan's book also details Katherine Jackson’s "abduction" this past July, with her rep telling the author that it was Janet who arranged for Dr. Allen Metzger to go to her mother's home where she had been living with Michael's three children, Paris, Prince and Blanket. Metzger allegedly advised Katherine not to make a trip to New Mexico by car, as she planned, because of her elevated blood pressure. Katherine was escorted to the airport by her daughter Rebbie and her granddaughter Stacee Brown, and it was then that she realized she had instead been booked on a flight to Tuscon, and was booked Miraval Resort & Spa, where Janet was waiting upon arrival.

Katherine's reps claim it was at this time that her children and grandchildren wrote a letter to the executors of Michael's estate asking them to resign and claimed their mother suffered a mini-stroke. Her reps say they conspired against her to attempt to gain a conservatorship over her possibly by demonstrating her incompetence to serve as guardian of Michael’s children, in an attempt to gain control of the late singer's fortune.

What followed was a bitter and public custody dispute over the singer's three children, and a judge ultimately ended up appointing Katherine and her grandson T.J Jackson as co-guardians.

For more, pick up the November issue of Vanity Fair on sale nationally Oct. 9.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2012, 10:00:25 PM »
http://www.contactmusic.com/news/janet-jackson-s-lawyer-dismisses-allegations-over-brother-michael-s-funeral_3314913

Janet Jackson's Lawyer Dismisses Allegations Over Brother Michael's Funeral
06 October 2012


Janet Jackson's lawyer has dismissed "outrageous" allegations suggesting the star delayed her late brother Michael's funeral over a financial dispute.

The Thriller hitmaker died on 25 June, 2009 after suffering a cardiac arrest brought on by an overdose of anaesthetic Propofol.

He was publicly remembered at a memorial the following month (Jul09) before a private burial took place in early September, 2009.
Editors at Vanity Fair alleged this week (begs01Oct12) that Janet had delayed her sibling's funeral over money owed relating to the burial plot deposit. The article appeared on the magazine's website on Thursday (04Oct12) and contained excerpts from Randall Sullivan's upcoming book, Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson - but the R&B singer's lawyer has moved swiftly to deny the report.

In a statement, obtained by ETOnline.com, Graydon Carter writes, "To falsely accuse Ms. Jackson of holding up her brother's funeral over money is outrageous. Ms. Jackson never delayed the funeral in any way.
"In fact, she paid for the funeral and was reimbursed for some of those expenses by Michael Jackson's estate in the year after the services took place. In addition, there were other private costs associated with Michael Jackson's passing that Ms. Jackson incurred and for which she never sought reimbursement."

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2012, 11:32:42 PM »
http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2012/10/janet-jackson-did-not-delay-michael-funeral

Janet Jackson Did Not Delay Michael's Funeral, The Family Couldn't Agree On Burial Place
Posted on Oct 09, 2012 @ 03:30PM 
By Jen Heger - Radar Assistant Managing Editor


Janet Jackson was accused of delaying her brother Michael's funeral three years ago because she wanted a hefty deposit of $40k returned, but RadarOnline.com has exclusively learned that the actual reason the King of Pop's burial took place several months after he died was because the family couldn't agree on where he should be laid to rest.

"Janet absolutely didn't delay Michael's funeral, that just never happened," a family insider tells RadarOnline.com exclusively. "The main reason for the delay was because the family just couldn't agree on where Michael should be buried. Jermaine and Randy wanted him buried at Neverland but Katherine was absolutely steadfast against that.

"Throw in the fact that Michael's kids had their own ideas and were grieving and there was obviously a lot going on. Janet was just trying to do the right thing at the time and she was very supportive of Michael's kids and her mother during that very dark time. For anyone else to say otherwise is just categorically false. Yes, tensions have developed since then between Janet and her mom over the handling of Michael's estate, but that doesn't change what happened in the weeks after Michael died."

As previously reported, according to Vanity Fair, which obtained an excerpt of a new biography on Jackson by Randall Sullivan: "Janet put up the $40,000 deposit at Forest Lawn to secure a spot for Michael but refused to let the funeral take place until the money was repaid."

Janet's attorney, Blair Brown fired off a letter to Vanity Fair's editor, Graydon Carter, demanding a retraction of the story. In the letter, which is posted on the singer's website, her lawyer says: "The article states that according to Untouchable, Ms. Jackson put down a $40,000 deposit to secure a burial plot for Michael Jackson but refused to let the funeral take place until that money was repaid. This is untrue. Ms. Jackson never delayed the funeral in any way. In fact, she paid for the funeral and was reimbursed for some of those expenses by Michael Jackson's estate in the year after the services took place.

"In addition, there were other private costs associated with Michael Jackson's passing that Ms. Jackson incurred and for which she has never sought reimbursement. To falsely accuse Ms. Jackson of holding up her brother's funeral over money is outrageous. This story is particularly hurtful and distressing because of Ms. Jackson's strong desire to serve her brother, whom she loved dearly, and her wish to stand with and support her family...I demand that Vanity Fair retract its statement that Ms. Jackson 'refused' to let Michael Jackson's funeral take place until the money she put down as a deposit on his burial plot was repaid...The article is replete with additional false and defamatory statements regarding Ms. Jackson. All statements regarding Ms. Jackson should be retracted and all other media website notified of the retractions."

"It's just absolutely sad that there are those in the world who are still trying to exploit Michael Jackson by writing false books about his life and death," the source says. "The Jackson family has been through enough and Michael's kids should be remembered before these ridiculous and false stories are released. No, this family isn't perfect, and they have a lot of issues, make no mistake about that… It just doesn't help to rehash and rewrite history for sensational headlines and to make money."

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 07:11:19 AM »
http://uk.eonline.com/news/352708/janet-jackson-demands-retraction-from-vanity-fair-over-michael-jackson-burial-story

Janet Jackson Demands Retraction From Vanity Fair Over Michael Jackson Burial Story
by Natalie Finn 9 October  5:41 PM


As if Janet Jackson hadn't been embroiled in enough family drama this year.

An attorney for the pop icon is demanding that Vanity Fair retract a story published online and in its November 2012 issue that claimed Michael Jackson's burial in 2009 was delayed because Janet demanded that the funeral not take place until her brother's estate had reimbursed her for the $40,000 burial-plot deposit she gave to the cemetery.

"Untrue" and "outrageous," lawyer Blair G. Brown called the story in a letter to V.F. editor-in-chief Graydon Carter.

Rather, Brown wrote, Janet paid for the funeral and Michael's estate reimbursed her for "some of those expenses" the following year. There were also private expenses that she never sought to be repaid for, Brown added.

"This story is particularly hurtful and distressing because of Ms. Jackson's strong desire to serve her brother,  whom she loved dearly," the attorney continued, "and her wish to stand with and support her family."

Team Janet also took issue with the excerpts from the book Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson that

Vanity Fair also published this month, noting that the burial-plot story sprang from the info in the so-called exposé.

Calling the article "replete with additional false and defamatory statements" regarding Janet, Brown demands that the magazine publish a retraction and reach out to any media outlets that based reports on the V.F. article to inform them of the retraction.

Huffington Post, the New York Daily News and London's Daily Mail were namechecked as a few of the sites that picked up the story, "exacerbating the damage to Ms. Jackson's reputation."

Vanity Fair has not yet returned a request for comment.

Michael Jackson was ultimately interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, Calif., on Sept. 3, 2009—a little more than two months after his death.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 06:49:16 PM »
http://www.aceshowbiz.com/news/view/00054529.html

Janet Jackson Sends Vanity Fair Legal Letter to Retract Article
October 10, 2012 17:22:59 GMT


In a lengthy letter to Vanity Fair's editor-in-chief, Janet Jackson demands a retraction of an article that the magazine has published in its November 2012 issue. The singer believed the media is trying to defame her by posting false story about her delaying brother Michael Jackson's funeral three years ago.

The article contained an excerpt of Randall Sullivan's upcoming book, "Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson". The book's author claimed Janet was delaying the funeral until she was reimbursed the $40,000 deposit to secure his plot.

In a legal letter sent via her attorney Blair G. Brown, Janet said, "Ms. Jackson never delayed the funeral in anyway. In fact, she paid for the funeral and was reimbursed for some of those expenses by Michael Jackson's estate in the year after the services took place. In addition, there were other private costs associated with Michael Jackson's passing that Ms. Jackson incurred and for which she has never sought reimbursement."

Brown continued, "To falsely accuse Ms. Jackson of holding up her brother's funeral over money is outrageous. This story is particularly hurtful and distressing because of Ms. Jackson's strong desire to serve her brother, whom she loved dearly, and he wish to stand with and support her family."

"I demand that Vanity Fair retract its statement that Ms. Jackson 'refused' to let Michael Jackson's funeral take place until the money she put down as a deposition on his burial plot was repaid," Brown wrote further. "To the extend that this statement appears in excerpts of Untouchable published in Vanity Fair's November 2012 issue, I demand that Vanity Fair publish a retraction explaining that the statement is false."

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2012, 06:53:51 PM »
http://www.entertainmentwise.com/news/90697/La-Toya-Jackson-Threatens-To-Sue-Magazine-Over-Claims-She-Looted-Michaels-Home

La Toya Jackson Threatens To Sue Magazine Over Claims She 'Looted Michael's Home'


US magazine Vanity Fair has accused La Toya Jackson of looting her brother Michael's home shortly after his death in 2009.

The late singer's sister is reportedly furious and is threatening to sue the magazine if it isn't retracted.

The article, which is titled 'Estate of Siege', appears in the mag's November issue, and alleges that she showed up at the King of Pop's house and started stuffing bags full of Mike's cash.

This allegedly occurred on June 25 2009, the day of Michael's passing.

Michael had died of cardiac arrest that morning, and La Toya then visited his house later that day, VF says that her boyfriend was seen later leaving the house in a moving van.

TheHollywoodGossip reports La Toya's response was as follows, that the story is "replete with misstatements of fact, false innuendos, and defamatory insinuations" and that she is prepared to sue unless it is immediately retracted.

La Toya, two years Michael's senior, had a music career in the1980s and 1990s, and appeared in her more famous brothers' TV show.

She has a new reality series planned for 2013 on Oprah Winfrey's O Network.


Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2012, 10:30:57 AM »
http://www.vibe.com/node/116848

VANITY FAIR REFUSES TO RETRACT "DEFAMATORY" ARTICLE ABOUT MICHAEL JACKSON'S FAMILY
Charley Rogulewski Posted October 13, 2012


Looks like Janet Jackson isn't going to be able to save her troubles for another day. The "Escapade" singer is piping mad over an article in the November issue of Vanity Fair that paints her as a miserly and selfish sister. So mad, she and her sister LaToya demanded the publication retract the story, titled "Estate Under Siege," but to no avail.

In it's latest issue, the high-end entertainment magazine plugs the new book Untouchable: The Strange Life and Tragic Death of Michael Jackson by Randall Sullivan with an excerpt from the book. In it, the author brings to light the awkward delay in burying Michael Jackson and claims Janet was responsible for the postponement, not allowing the funeral to take place until MJ's estate had reimbursed her for the $40,000 burial-plot deposit she gave to the California cemetery. The article also states that they used a moving truck to remove black plastic bags of cash and duffels full of the late pop icon's belongings from the estate in the hours after his death.

Janet and her lawyers, in a letter sent to Vanity Fair, alleged the story was "outrageous" and "untrue," as well as "replete with additional false and defamatory statements." Along with the retraction, they asked that Vanity Fair send a letter to publications like the New York Daily News and Huffington Post who picked up on the story stating the article was false. But, Vanity Fair had a different response in mind.

"Vanity Fair stands by Randall Sullivan's assertion that Janet Jackson's demand to be reimbursed for her deposit on her brother's burial plot was one of the reasons Michael Jackson's funeral was delayed," they told E! News. "Sullivan's sources told him that the amount of the deposit was $40,000, but records released last week indicate that the amount of the deposit was $49,000. Vanity Fair will make that correction on VF.com."

Ouch. Talk about pouring salt into an open wound.

LaToya's lawyers sent a similar letter. "In the absence of such a prompt retraction," they wrote, "our clients intend to commence legal proceedings to vindicate their reputation."

But the magazine still held their ground firmly, saying they saw "no basis to reconsider what was written."

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2012, 11:09:47 AM »
http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2012/10/janet-jackson-paying-michael-jackson-funeral-vanity-fair-admits-mistake

Vanity Fair Admits To Mistake In Bombshell Michael Jackson Funeral Story
Posted on Oct 15, 2012 @ 06:30AM  By Jen Heger - Radar Assistant Managing Editor


Vanity Fair is admitting to making a mistake in a story in its October issue in which it claimed Janet Jackson delayed her brother Michael's funeral for several months in a dispute over money, but the magazine's admission will surely not satisfy the Nasty singer, RadarOnline.com is exclusively reporting.

As RadarOnline.com previously reported, Janet was accused of delaying her brother Michael's funeral three years ago because she wanted a hefty deposit of $40k returned that she had put down. According to Vanity Fair, which obtained an excerpt of a new biography on the King of Pop by Randall Sullivan, "Janet put up the $40,000 deposit at Forest Lawn to secure a spot for Michael, but refused to let the funeral take place until the money was repaid."

Janet's lawyer demanded a full retraction of the story, and RadarOnline.com has confirmed through multiple sources that the Control singer did not delay Michael's funeral because she demanded repayment of 40k.

Despite that fact, in a surprising turn of events, the magazine told E! News that it stands by its story and asserted that new, just-released records indicate Janet's deposit was actually 49k. "Vanity Fair stands by Randall Sullivan's assertion that Janet Jackson's demand to be reimbursed for her deposit on her brother's burial plot was one of the reasons Michael Jackson's funeral was delayed," the mag told E! News. "Sullivan's sources told him that the amount of the deposit was $40,000, but records released last week indicate that the amount of the deposit was $49,000. Vanity Fair will make that correction on VF.com."

According to an updated story on Vanity Fair's website says, "a previous version of this blog post reported that the amount of Janet's deposit was $40,000. Records released last week indicate that the actual amount was $49,000."

RadarOnline.com thoroughly reviewed court and public records in an attempt to locate the documents Vanity Fair referenced and couldn't find any. When asked to provide the "new documents," Vanity Fair spokesperson said: "I was mistaken. They were not new."

"Janet never attempted to delay Michael's funeral for any reason relating money issues. In fact, Janet never tried to delay it for any reason and wanted the funeral to take place as soon as possible because of the ongoing stress and angst it was causing Katherine and Michael's children," a source close to the situation tells us.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2012, 11:43:24 AM »
http://www.bet.com/news/celebrities/2012/10/16/vanity-fair-admits-to-faux-pas-in-mj-burial-tale.html

Vanity Fair Admits to Faux Pas in MJ Burial Tale
Magazine corrects Janet Jackson’s down payment amount, but does not retract story.
By Clarissa Simpson
Posted: 10/16/2012 09:00 AM EDT


The Jackson family war continues. This time there is more fall out over the book excerpt published in Vanity Fair’s November issue.

The publication is now admitting they made a mistake in the story where it claimed that Janet Jackson delayed her brother’s funeral for several months over a money dispute according to Radar Online. However, Vanity Fair isn’t retracting the allegation, which was taken from Randall Sullivan’s new book, Untouchable, it’s just a making a minor adjustment in the burial down payment amount.

In Untouchable, Sullivan claims that Janet Jackson put up the $40,000 deposit to secure a burial spot for Michael Jackson’s final resting place at Forest Lawn. But the magazine confirmed to E! News that records released last week show that Janet’s deposit was actually for $49K, not $40,000. Vanity Fair plans to make the correction on VF.com, but the publication stands by the rest of its story.

“Vanity Fair stands by Randall Sullivan’s assertion that Janet Jackson’s demand to be reimbursed for her deposit on her brother’s burial plot was one of the reasons Michael Jackson’s funeral was delayed,” the magazine told E! News.

This is certainly not the correction Janet Jackson was hoping for. The Control singer’s lawyer demanded a full retraction of the story, calling the claims “untrue” and stating that Janet never delayed the funeral.

“Janet absolutely didn’t delay Michael’s funeral, that just never happened. The main reason for the delay was because the family just couldn’t agree on where Michael should be buried,” a family insider told Radar Online. “Jermaine and Randy wanted him buried at Neverland. Katherine was absolutely steadfast against that…Yes, tensions have developed since then between Janet and her mom over the handling of Michael’s estate, but that doesn’t change what happened in the weeks after Michael died.”

This latest chapter makes it evident that this story is far from over.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2012, 10:12:18 AM »
http://wzakcleveland.com/3509412/michael-jackson-book-untouchable/

New Book (‘Untouchable’) Unveils More Jackson Family Drama
Oct 29, 2012


The Jackson family drama can go on and on and on.
The latest bit of their soap opera picks right back up from the money issues and the Katherine Jackson ‘kidnapping.’
Allegedly, the ridiculousness was a plot, devised by Janet, Rebbie, Jermaine, and Randy, in order to show the court that grandma is not good enough to be a guardian. And it worked. The guardianship was awarded to TJ Jackson.

Oh, there’s more. Now the family’s dirty little secrets are compiled in a book, “Untouchable,” which appears in an excerpt of “Vanity Fair.”
From the bag of money snatched from Michael’s home shortly after his death; to the King of Pop’s will, the book looks pretty juicy.

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2012, 11:48:34 AM »
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2230966/The-curse-Michaels-millions-How-Michael-Jacksons-family-preyed-fabulous-wealth-life-took-vanload-death.html

Curse of Michael's millions: How Michael Jackson's family preyed on his wealth and took it by the vanload after his death
New biography expose how the Jackson family used the King of Pop for his money
By RANDALL SULLIVAN
PUBLISHED: 22:00 GMT, 10 November 2012 | UPDATED: 22:00 GMT, 10 November 2012


In the late summer of 2001, Michael Jackson’s family were after him again. It was two days before his scheduled departure for New York, where his 30th Anniversary concerts were to be staged at Madison Square Garden.

Performers would include Destiny’s Child, Ray Charles and Whitney  Houston, and friends Elizabeth Taylor and Marlon Brando had been recruited to deliver televised speeches.

Michael wanted his family in New York as well; his brothers to perform a medley of hits from their days as the Jackson 5, while his parents sat in special box seats. The Jacksons insisted that they should receive appearance fees and it was agreed that family members would get honorariums of $250,000, even those who would just be there to watch the show.

Just days before the first concert, though, Jermaine Jackson read an article that said his brother would be making as much as $10 million from the two shows and convinced his parents that Michael should pay the three of them another $500,000 apiece.

Jermaine and his father Joe drew  up a contract and, with mother Katherine in tow, chased Michael around California to try to get him to sign.
Michael took refuge for several days at the house of his friend Marc Schaffel, co-producer of the event, then made a dash north to Neverland Ranch. He and his two young children, four-year-old Prince and three-year-old Paris, had barely set foot inside  the house when Joe, Katherine and Jermaine appeared at the gate.

Michael told the security guards to tell his family he wasn’t there. Joe Jackson, though, refused to budge. ‘I’m his father,’ Joe told the guards. ‘I need to use the bathroom. His mother needs to use the bathroom. Let us in.’

Frantic, Michael phoned Schaffel. If they got through the gate, his family would hound him to sign this contract, he explained. But he couldn’t keep his mother locked outside when she was pleading just to use the bathroom.

He told Schaffel he would instruct the guards to tell his family again that Mr Jackson was not on the premises, but to admit them so that they could use the facilities.

But as soon as Joe and Jermaine were through the gate, they drove to the main house and pushed their way inside. ‘They literally ransacked the place,’ Schaffel remembered.

Michael retreated with Prince and Paris to a hiding place concealed behind a secret door at the back of his bedroom closet and phoned Schaffel from there. He was in tears, literally whimpering into the phone.

‘You see what they do to me? Do you understand now why I don’t want anything to do with my brothers, why I hide from them and refuse to answer their phone calls?

‘I’ve supported my brothers, supported them all,’ Michael cried. ‘I’ve put their kids through school. But they still come after me, still wanting more. It never ends. And my father’s worse than they are.’

Michael choked up, Schaffel recalled, and then sobbed: ‘The worst part, the part that kills me, is that I have to lie to my own mother. Do you understand, Marc?’ Michael asked. ‘Do you understand now why I am the way I am? How else could I be?

For someone who so often professed his loneliness, Michael Jackson spent a remarkable amount of time avoiding people. He wore disguises, broke off relationships, and changed telephone numbers, but still paparazzi, delusional women, and desperate men pursued him. The saddest part, though, was that the people Michael took the greatest pains to elude were the members of his own family.

Until the time he found a way to live off his sons’ talent, his father Joe had worked the four-to-midnight shift as a crane operator amid the blast-furnace heat of the Inland Steel Mill, in Gary, Indiana. He earned barely enough to sustain the family home – a tiny aluminium-sided cube in which 11 people shared a bathroom.

Michael’s memories of early rehearsals all centred on the father/manager  who bellowed at them constantly, smacking his sons or throwing them into walls if they made a mistake.

When the band signed to Motown, Michael was quickly singled out as the star. Jackie and Tito possessed only modest musical talent and Marlon had none at all. Jermaine had an adequate singing voice.

Such was Michael’s talent that just one year after signing with the label, the group delivered a debut record, I Want You Back, that shot to the top of the Billboard Hot 100.

In February 1970, the Jackson 5 released their second single, ABC. And with The Love You Save and I’ll Be There, they became the first group ever to send their first four releases to the top of the charts.

Between tours, Joe and his sons returned home to a five-bedroom, six-bathroom mansion in the Los Angeles enclave of Encino. There was  an Olympic-size swimming pool, sports facilities, luxury cars and servants’ quarters.

By the mid-Seventies, the Jackson 5 were in professional decline – in sharp contrast with Michael, the true star of the group.
His brothers had wanted to work on the Off The Wall album with him, but Michael refused, even when his mother attempted to convince him that he owed them. Released in 1979, it sold nearly seven million copies worldwide.

Then came the release of Thriller in December 1982, which turned him into, as Rolling Stone put it, ‘quite simply, the biggest star in the pop music universe’. Off The Wall had already made him wealthier than the rest of his family put together, now he would earn more than $200 million from sales of the Thriller album.

No longer his manager, his father was as calculating as ever. He knew that playing the boys against one another was a winning strategy. What a great idea it would be, he suggested to Jackie, Tito, Marlon, and Randy, to capitalise on the  success of Thriller by including Michael in a ‘reunion tour’.

Michael resisted. He was tired of touring, he said, tired of all the attention, tired of travel and hotel rooms. Tired of his family, period.
The brothers first tried using guilt to sway him. Marlon was going through a divorce and couldn’t even make his mortgage payments. Maybe he should sell up and buy a smaller house, Michael suggested. The brothers then called a meeting at which they showed up with a life-size poster of Michael and told him they were going to put it onstage in his place. Michael wouldn’t relent. It was time to play their ace in the hole.

During a private meeting Katherine requested with Michael, she implored him to join his brothers on the tour. They needed the money, she told her son. Finally, when all else failed, she pulled out the big gun: ‘For me, Michael, please?’

It was a choice between the only two things Michael had, his mother’s love and his career. He chose his mother’s love, of course.

At the first stop in Kansas City, Jermaine told a reporter: ‘Even though Michael is very talented, a lot of his success has been due to timing and a little bit of luck. It could have been him, or it could just as easily have been me.’

Michael distanced himself from his brothers as the tour progressed, refusing to stay on the same hotel floor with them. He insisted his attorneys be present at the business meetings that, within the first few dates, became the only conversations he had with his siblings. The other Jacksons insisted upon  collecting their payments immediately after each show.

No one in his family, though, was prepared for the shout-out Michael gave on December 9, 1984: ‘This is our last and final show. It’s been a long 20 years and we love you all.’

Michael looked at the shocked expressions on his brothers’ faces and couldn’t suppress his smile.

Now established as one of the most famous families on the planet, life among the Jacksons was becoming a soap opera, and a sordid one at that. Michael was determined to distance himself.

The public humiliations seemed endless. In 1983, Jackie’s affair with Los Angeles Lakers cheerleader and future television talent-show judge Paula Abdul blew up his marriage. In March 1987, Jermaine showed up for Marlon’s birthday party carrying his three-month-old son by a woman named Margaret Maldonado, while his wife looked on with an expression of bewilderment.

During their divorce, Jermaine’s wife Hazel would allege that her husband had attempted to rape her.

By 1990, Michael had moved  to  Neverland, his personal amusement park in Santa Barbara County, California.

He made no comment when newspapers reported that Randy’s wife Eliza was accusing her husband of beating her throughout her pregnancy.

The Jackson brothers were all just like Joe, Eliza told a reporter, except for Michael.
Though they depended on his money, usually dispensed through their mother Katherine, his siblings weren’t averse to criticising their brother in public.

Michael’s relationship with his  sister La Toya was shattered in December 1993, when she responded to the Jordan Chandler scandal by holding a press conference in Tel Aviv, at which she declared her belief that the accusations against her brother were true.

‘I can’t remain silent,’ she squeaked into a bank of microphones. ‘I will not be a silent collaborator in his crimes against small, innocent  children.’
[Jordan was a 13-year-old boy whom Michael has been accused of sexually molesting. The claims, which Jackson always denied, resulted in a payment of more than $18 million to the boy’s family. He would later describe the decision to make a deal with the Chandlers, his lawyer said, as ‘the worst mistake of his life’.]

In 2003, when Michael’s world was collapsing all around him, amid his arrest on further child molestation charges, of which he would be acquitted two years later, Jermaine had gone to New York publishers with a ‘tell-all’ book proposal.

The Jacksons viewed youngest brother Randy as the most conniving among them. He was a chip off the old block, far more like Joe than any of his brothers, visitors said – and that wasn’t intended as a  compliment.

Joe Jackson had been hiding from creditors since 1987. He was living mostly on hand-outs from Katherine (who divvied up the $25,000 cheque Michael sent to her each month among needy family members) and was incessantly looking for opportunities to draw his most famous son into business deals.

‘They all looked to Michael as an ATM machine,’ observed the Los Angeles attorney and radio host  Leo Terrell.
Within hours of Michael’s death on June 25, 2009, the battle over the estate began. The King of Pop was going to be worth a billion dollars, maybe two billion, maybe more. The women of the clan initiated what became a week-long occupation and search of the Carolwood Drive chateau in Los Angeles where he died.

The first night, La Toya Jackson and her boyfriend Jeffre Phillips demanded to be admitted to the house. Three hours later, Katherine went inside after them.

It was mid-morning in London when Michael’s children’s former nanny Grace Rwaramba received a call from Katherine.
According to Rwaramba, Katherine began the conversation: ‘Grace, the children are crying. They are asking about you. They can’t believe that their father died. Grace, you remember Michael used to hide cash at the house? I’m here. Where can it be?’

But security guards said it was La Toya, along with her boyfriend, who loaded black rubbish bags filled with cash into duffel bags and placed them in the garage. La Toya would later insist that nearly all of Michael’s money was gone by the time she arrived at the house.

It did not become obvious that the Jacksons intended to remove whatever valuables were inside the house until the next morning, when Janet Jackson arrived at the front gate and demanded that it be opened to admit the moving van behind her.

A couple of hours later the van left with La Toya’s boyfriend  Phillips at the wheel.

Katherine and her daughters made it clear they wouldn’t be leaving any time soon. ‘They camped out for most of a week,’ the head of the security firm recalled, coming and going ‘whenever they felt like it.’

Michael’s will came to light about a week after his death; its executors were to be a lawyer, an accountant and a former record company executive named by Michael. It stipulated that 40 per cent of his estate was to be held in trust for Prince, Paris, and his third child Blanket. Another 20 per cent would be assigned to various charities; the remaining  40 per cent would be used to support Katherine, who would be guardian of Michael’s children. After Katherine’s death, her share would revert to the children.

In the meantime, the executors had ‘absolute discretion’ to decide how the money from the Katherine Jackson Trust would be distributed. There was no provision for Michael’s father or siblings.

Over the next two years, the clamour among Katherine’s children to collect their mother’s share of the estate grew ever more threatening. For some time, almost nothing was left over for Katherine’s children; according to the executors, Michael had made it clear that he did not intend to provide for his siblings.

Even when Katherine’s monthly stipend was increased to $8,000, several of her children demanded that she challenge the estate’s administration.

The opening act of the craziest Jackson family drama since Michael’s death began on July 14, when Katherine, 82, was flown to a spa resort in Tucson, Arizona, without the knowledge of her grandchildren, but accompanied by a group of her children.

Within a few days, the media were reporting on a letter that had been signed by five of Michael’s siblings – Randy, Janet, Jermaine, Rebbie, and Tito – demanding that the executors of Michael’s will resign and stating that the will itself was ‘fake, flawed, and fraudulent’.

[The American courts have upheld the will. Yet the allegations, dismissed by the executors as wrong and defamatory,  surfaced again last month when David Gest, a longtime friend of Michael, spoke out in support of the siblings’ claim.]

The adults responsible for Michael’s children, including his nephew TJ Jackson, became convinced that Michael’s brothers and sisters intended to gain a conservatorship [a legal form of control in America] over Katherine, possibly by demonstrating her incompetence to serve as the guardian of the children. The money, as everyone knew, would follow those three children.

Still more outlandish, though, were the events of Monday, July 23. Shortly after 1pm, Prince and Paris were in an SUV returning home to the Calabasas estate through the double gates when another SUV, loaded with passengers, pulled right up to  its bumper.

Randy Jackson was at the wheel of the tailing vehicle, which made it to the inner gate just as the barrier was coming down.

He just drove through and broke the arm off,’ recalled Sandra Ribera, an associate of Katherine’s lawyer, who was watching from the pool house. ‘All of a sudden the doors open and there’s this swarm of people pointing cameras all around.’

Ribera said the people in the driveway were Randy Jackson, Janet Jackson, Jermaine Jackson, and several of Prince, Paris, and Blanket’s cousins. It was friendly at first, with hugs all round.

But Katherine’s security team, who were guarding the house, quickly realised that the other Jacksons were there to take Michael’s children. Janet went for her niece Paris, while Randy approached Prince and Jermaine engaged the guards, all three of them still using their cell phones as video cameras. When Janet and Randy told Paris and Prince they were coming with them, both teenagers flatly refused to go.

Prince turned his back on Randy, but Jermaine pulled the boy aside and told him this was something that had been in the planning for three years and that it was important for him to join in with the rest of the family.

Prince shrugged off Jermaine and continued walking toward the house. Paris, meanwhile, made it clear to Janet that she wouldn’t be leaving.

The TMZ entertainment website would initially report, based on anonymous sources, that Janet told Paris she was a ‘spoiled little she devil’ and that Paris answered: ‘This is our house, not the Jackson family house. Get the f*** out!’

When security guards blocked his way, Randy, who had been smiling up until then, began to snarl warnings about not interfering in a family matter.

One of the guards suggested perhaps he should leave the property and Randy became enraged, cursing in the man’s face, which was when Trent Jackson, a cousin and a member of the security team, grabbed him. The two grappled, then the bull-strong Trent put Randy in a headlock.

The scuffle ended when Trent withdrew with Prince and Paris into the house. Those who were staying at Calabasas would say later that the saddest thing about the entire scene was the way  Jermaine had used his sons.

‘Jermaine is cursing as bad as you can curse in front of these kids and fighting and doing all this stuff, and he’s telling his kids to videotape it,’ Ribera recalled. ‘And Jermajesty [Jermaine’s son] . . . is just sobbing. His face is covered in tears. He’s taping, but he’s sobbing.’

A sheriff’s car answering an emergency call arrived at the front gate and everyone froze. The sheriff’s deputies persuaded Randy, Janet, and Jermaine and their group to leave.

‘Gotta love fam,’ Paris tweeted to her followers shortly after they were gone.

On July 26, Katherine was finally brought home. That series of clumsily plotted scenes left her brood more divided than ever. But it was a comfort to her to know that, in the end, they would all be together again.

Katherine’s deal with Forest Lawn Cemetery to acquire Michael’s crypt in the Sanctuary of Ascension had included the purchase of 11 other burial spots. In death, Michael Jackson would be surrounded by the family he had tried to keep at a distance for most of his life.

Untouchable: The Strange Life And Tragic Death of Michael Jackson by Randall Sullivan is published by Grove Press, priced £18.99.
To order your copy at £16.99 with free p&p, call The Review Bookstore on 0843 382 1111 or go to  mailshop.co.uk/books

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2012, 11:55:23 AM »
http://www.showbiz411.com/2012/11/10/review-new-michael-jackson-book-misses-great-stuff-cobbles-together-old-news

Review: New Michael Jackson Book Misses Great Stuff, Cobbles Together Old News
11/10/12 11:06pm Roger Friedman


Part 1:
If Randall Sullivan’s 700 page book about Michael Jackson, called “Untouchable,” had footnotes on its pages it would look like a mathematics printout. So Sullivan instead simply wrote his book, then tacked on a couple hundred pages of ‘chapter notes’ and explanations for how he mixed together thousands of pieces of previously published pieces about Jackson to make them look original. And got most of it wrong.

As it is, this part of “Untouchable” is more interesting than the book. It’s where I found  my own name cited at least 87 times in the book--and not always favorably. (He does say some nice things about me, for which I am certainly grateful.) I don’t know Randall Sullivan, I’ve never spoken to him or met him. He’s never tried to contact me. I’m sure I’m not the only person from whom he’s constructed his story. David Jones of the UK’s Daily Mail will find a lot of his work in there.

And 87 times isn’t enough. He’s made it seem like he reported a lot, but it’s just noted at the back, separately. Not credited to me: Michael Jackson’s prosecutors throwing a victory party before the verdict came in. Here’s the original story, which the Drudge Report picked up from me on June 11, 2005 as its top story with a flashing ambulance siren: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,159140,00.html

Indeed so much of “Untouchable” comes out of my old stories, reading the book was like re-encountering long lost friends. Sullivan is very odd about the 2005 molestation trial because he wasn’t there. And strangely, he does quote Fox News’s Wendy Murphy, who was a commentator but didn’t report on the trial. I was in Santa Maria, California for months but never met her. But Fox had Trace Gallagher and lots of good people on the ground whom I saw often.

Because he wasn’t at the trial, Sullivan’s missed two of the funniest moments. At one point Janet Arvizo, the crazy mother who accused Michael Jackson of molesting her son, told defense lawyer Tom Mesereau on the stand that she thought Michael was going to kidnap her kids and take them away “in a hot air balloon.” It was one of Mesereau’s more stunning moments. And it’s too bad Sullivan didn’t get it since he lavishes praise on Mesereau for speaking with him. Mesereau’s dazzling performance in that courtroom still has not been adequately portrayed.

This is from my trial notes, and the printed transcript:
Mesereau to Janet Arvizo: Now, you told the sheriffs at one point you thought your family might disappear in a hot air balloon from Neverland, correct?
Witness:  I made them aware that they had a variety of ways of getting my children out and that was one of  them.

Also, Sullivan, I guess, never actually saw the outtakes that Jackson’s own videographer had of the Martin Bashir interview. Michael, drunk on wine from a Coke can, tells Bashir he wanted to throw a celebrity going away party for Bubbles the Chimp. Lassie wouldn’t be able to attend, Michael said, because he was probably dead. The press saw that video four times in the courtroom, and we even threw our own “Celebrity Animal Party” one night. It was the high point of a long, pointless four months.

More in Part 2, coming up…

Offline IamSpeechless

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2012, 08:40:44 PM »
Michael Jackson: Correcting the New, and Not Very Good, Book About the Pop Star

11/13/12 12:47amRoger Friedman
 
Part 2: Randall Sullivan is just overwhelmed by his material, but gets lots of stuff wrong in his new book about Michael Jackson, called “Untouchable.” The book is panned by Michiko Kakutani in today’s New York Times.
For example, Jackson hosted a Christmas in Bahrain for friends from the U.S. (which I reported exclusively at the time). Sullivan says Michael was thrilled when “Frank Cascio and his family” arrived. Wrong. Frank Cascio never went to Bahrain. He even said so in his book this year. Michael didn’t see Frank Cascio from some time before he was arrested in November 2003 until Jackson arrived at the Cascios’ home in New Jersey (which I also reported exclusively) in August 2007.

Sullivan’s main problem is that he wasn’t there for any of it, but tried to cash in on Michael Jackson once he died. Imagine someone writing a biography of Batman and only interviewing the Penguin, the Riddler, Catwoman, and the Joker. The writer fails to speak to Robin, Alfred or Commissioner Gordon.

Sullivan’s sources are a rogues’ gallery of adversaries: Tohme, Raymone Bain, Brian Oxman, Ray Chandler (brother of Evan, uncle of Jordie), Raymone Bain, etc. Former lawyer Oxman was disbarred on July 6, 2012, which Sullivan only mentions as an aside late in his book. He needed him as a legit source.

Tohme wormed his way into Jackson’s life, and had to be excised in the final months by people who actually cared about Jackson. Apparently, Sullivan and Tohme became quite close. According to his alarming notes in the book:
“At the time, I was trying to help Tohme settle his differences with both the Jackson family and the Michael Jackson estate (and, of course, collect whatever useful information might surface in the process).”
Conflicts of interest abound:  buried deep in the book is this revelation: Sullivan introduced Katherine Jackson to her new lawyer, Perry Sanders, who was also Sullivan’s friend. Then Sullivan turned around and used Sanders and his associate Sandy Ribera as sources. Sullivan even admits he gave Ribera a first draft of the book to comment on. What is going on here?

As for Tohme: I’ve never met him, but for a time I listened to his prevarications on the phone. These included that he was a doctor of some kind, and a special ambassador to Senegal. He conceded to me that he was actually not a licensed physician finally. He held on to the ambassador story.
I received this email on March 23, 2009 from the Senegal embassy in Washington DC:

Mansour,
Senegal has no Ambassador at large in that name. the Ambassadors at large
are senegalese citizen. It is possible to have alien as ambassador for a
specific reason, fight for women freedom, goodwill ambassador etc..
But I don’t know this Mr. Tohme.
Fatoumata B. NDAO
Counselor
Health, Environment & Education
Embassy of Senegal

Sullivan doesn’t like this piece of information. He says in his notes that I “found someone” with the Embassy who didn’t know Tohme. He says he’s seen Tohme’s Senegalese passport, with the words ‘special ambassador’ written in by the country’s dictator, er, president for life. Well, I have the email chain from the embassy. And unless Sullivan can i.d. the handwriting of the president, I think there’s a problem.

“Untouchable” is full of assumptions. And to get away with it, Sullivan admits to them in the back of his book. He writes: “I acknowledge that the long plastic surgery section in this chapter could be described as interpretive, perhaps even as opinionated. It was the result of nearly three years of research and dozens of conversations with people who knew MJ. The point of view is my own, but it’s an informed point of view.” Huh? He wrote a 700 page book but doesn’t have the facts. His informed point of view, plus 3 bucks, will get you a copy of the National Enquirer.

I do take particular exception with Sullivan’s intent to throw Michael’s long time friend and manager, the late Frank DiLeo, under the bus so to speak. DiLeo was a complex man, certainly. But he loved Michael and vice versa. Early on Frank was cheated out of millions that he could have made from Thriller and Bad.

After he and Michael split, Frank’s life was full of financial difficulties. As others grew rich from his projects, he struggled. Now Sullivan, taking Tohme’s side, thinks he can paint DiLeo as a villain to Tohme’s hero. I won’t allow it. Frank knew a charlatan when he saw one, and he disliked Tohme from the start. Now Tohme gets to exact his revenge against a dead man– and Sullivan is only too happy to help in exchange for his “exclusive” interview.

Also wrong, wrong, wrong: Frank DiLeo had open heart surgery at Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles on March 21, 2011. He did not “check into a hospital in Pittsburgh.” Frank languished in coma at Cedars Sinai for three months until he was moved to a facility in Pittsburgh.

And there’s more that Sullivan gets wrong, like how the story broke that Jackson and his kids stayed in New Jersey in the summer and fall of 2007–there’s the story: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,312120,00.html. What Sullivan has done is  chop up a lot of pieces he’s found in research, mash them together and put them in a blender on high speed.  The result is something that tastes and smells bad.

http://www.showbiz411.com/2012/11/13/michael-jackson-correcting-the-new-and-not-very-good-book-about-the-pop-star

Offline MJVoyeur

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Re: Vanity Fair October 2012 & New Book UNTOUCHABLE
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2012, 08:12:38 PM »
That friggin book sat on Amazon for two years! No wonder its called "Untouchable". The book's cover jacket was from a photo of Michael performing to the present black silhoette(sp). Access Hollywood was reporting it like it was the gospel truth which it isn't. It is shameful for some of things that are about people just so a book can sell. Do these "authors" actually do any research before they sit down to pen a book?  :hmmm:I felt like a bit of a conspiracy theorist when Dileo died a year after Michael. It still makes me wonder sometimes about what really was going with Michael and who really knew what?! :hmmm: