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Author Topic: BAD 25 All News & Info  (Read 12100 times)

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Offline moonstreet

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Re: BAD 25 All News & Info
« Reply #45 on: November 25, 2012, 11:26:11 AM »
http://www.billboard.com/news/michael-jackson-s-duet-partner-siedah-garrett-1008025642.story#/news/michael-jackson-s-duet-partner-siedah-garrett-1008025642.story

Michael Jackson's Duet Partner Siedah Garrett Talks 'Bad25'
by Gary Graff, Detroit  |   November 21, 2012 1:30 EST


There's a moment in Spike Lee's new Michael Jackson documentary "Bad25" that Siedah Garrett - co-writer of "Man in the Mirror" and the late Jackson's duet partner on "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" - particularly favors.
 
"When Michael said he wanted to record 'Man in the Mirror,' the demo was in a key that was comfortable for me and one step too high for Michael," Garrett tells Billboard. "So he wanted me to re-sing the demo in the new key, and when I went into the studio to do it in the new key Michael followed me with a video camera. I said, 'What are you doing?' He said, 'I want to record you performing the song… because I want to sing it like you.' And I'm like, 'Great, Mike; all my friends are really gonna believe me when I tell them, 'Oh, Michael Jackson wanted to sound like me.' And I'm cracking up and he's cracking up, but he's still recording. And it's in ('Bad25'). I never thought I would see it because it's Michael's personal footage. It's amazing."
 
Adding to the amazement; "You can see a little bit of him in a reflection in the mirror in the studio. You can see him videotaping me singing the song in the new key, and it's like HE'S the man in the mirror."
 
"Bad25," which airs at 9:30 p.m. Thanksgiving Day on ABC and is also for sale on DVD and Blu-ray, includes many such behind-the-scenes moments in the making of the 1987 album, which ranks as the fifth best-selling album all-time with estimates of up to 45 million copies sold worldwide. It's also the first album to unleash five consecutive No. 1 singles, including "I Just Can't Stop Loving You" and "Man in the Mirror."

It's notable that "Bad" got a documentary for its silver anniversary while its predecessor, the more impactful "Thriller," did not, but Garrett has her own theory about why "Bad" resonates so significantly right now.
 
"'Bad25' is such a stellar marker in time because (Jackson) was still alive when 'Thriller' was 25 years old," Garrett notes. "He was still alive and getting ready to tour, so there was a different kind of vibe going on. I think the fact he's passed now is what makes 'Bad' more special. I did notice that when he passed away, all the news footage and all the specials about his life, it wasn't 'Michael Jackson The Thriller' or 'Michael Jackson Beat It;' it was 'Michael Jackson Man In the Mirror.' That just spoke volumes to me."
 
"I Just Can't Stop Loving You," meanwhile, had its own behind-the-scenes drama that "Bad25" captures. Jackson and producer Quincy Jones originally considered big-name partners such as Barbra Streisand, Whitney Houston, Aretha Franklin and others. Unable to snag one, they chose Garrett, then working as one of Jones' staff songwriters. But they neglected to mention it to her until it was time to record the song.
 
"Quincy called me back and I thought we were still finishing 'Man in the Mirror,' 'cause we had been working on that a few days earlier and I knew we hadn't finished it," Garrett remembers. "There was another song being played, so I thought maybe they were running behind. I just made myself comfortable sitting behind Quincy and knitting, and then he says over his shoulder, 'Do you think this song?' I'm like, 'Yeah, yeah.' Then he said, 'Can you sing it?' 'Yeah.' He said, 'Go in there and sing it. Michael, go in there,' and as we're walking through the door it hit me I was gonna sing this song with Michael - who, Garrett adds, spent the whole take throwing popcorn at her while she was singing her parts.
 
Garrett has recently released a tribute song called "Keep on Loving You" that she calls "an answer to our duet. I never got to express to him how much what he did for me - introducing me to the world as a singer and a songwriter - meant to me. So I wrote it down in a song, just my sentiments about how I was feeling the day I met him and how surprised I was to find out he was as cool as he was. It's just a love song, a basic love song."

Offline moonstreet

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Re: BAD 25 All News & Info
« Reply #46 on: November 25, 2012, 11:28:09 AM »
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-michael-jackson-bad-25-review-20121122,0,6949598.story

TV review: Hypnotic 'Michael Jackson: Bad 25' is fitting tribute
Spike Lee's TV version shows the singer's dedication as framed by the talent and rigor that went into creating 'Bad.'
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
November 22, 2012, 6:00 a.m.


In a welcome break from the traditionally saccharine holiday programming, ABC is airing "a version" of Spike Lee's documentary "Michael Jackson: Bad 25," which had its premiere at the Venice International Film Festival before having a short theatrical release. Lee trimmed almost an hour for the television version, but "Bad 25" is still something to be thankful for, a hypnotic homage to the performer's gift and, more important, his dedication.

Wielding an impressive collection of behind-the-scenes clips as well as interviews with a disparate array of colleagues (including Martin Scorsese and Sheryl Crow), Lee uses the creation of the album and the "short films" (Jackson eschewed the term music video) the songs inspired to keep his focus firmly on Jackson's work. Although there is brief mention of things like Jackson's shyness, his increasingly pale skin and his choice to speak and sing in the higher registers of his impressive three-octave range, that's as personal it gets. Lee's window is definitively, and almost defiantly, framed by the ambition, talent and rigor that went into creating "Bad."

PHOTOS: Michael Jackson | Life in pictures

Indeed, the structure of the film mirrors the album. After a brief discussion of Jackson's refusal to rest on the laurels of the record-breaking "Thriller — according to his bodyguard and confidant, Jackson wrote 100,000,000 for "Bad" on his mirror in a Sharpie to remind him that this album would outsell "Thriller" — Lee begins breaking down the multimedia production of "Bad" beginning with the decision to go with what would become the iconic look of Jackson in his studded and be-buckled black leather.

The look, says Kanye West, made "Bad" an even more seminal album than "Thriller." "I'm almost dressed like that today," West says.

The strongest portion of this version follows the creation of the short film for the title track. Scorsese agreed to direct and brought in screenwriter Richard Price, with whom he had just worked on "The Color of Money."

"Michael wanted to make a video to show the brothers he was down," says Price with a laugh. "So the Italian asthmatic goes to the Jewish asthmatic to make Michael a homie."

Watching as the video assembled — it was, among other things, the film debut of Wesley Snipes — and the dance scene choreographed, the sense of Jackson as both an obsessively dedicated performer and a boy living in a bubble (he cannot believe people actually live in the Harlem location chosen for part of the film) comes vividly to life. (It is also great fun to see a young and bearded Scorsese doing his thing in the Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station.)

Especially effective are the clips of Jackson working with choreographer Jeffrey Daniel in early rehearsals (at the Helmsley Palace of course). Daniel, like Scorsese is also on hand in present time to deconstruct all the decisions that led to the final product.

Each song receives a similar breakdown and occasionally the film threatens to put out its own fire with a smothering blanket of praise, but Lee more than makes his point: No matter how distracting or disturbing the personal details get, at a certain level an artist must be defined by the work.

Moreover, the Jackson seen here, at the height of his power, is still recognizable as a man rather than the tabloid myth he was to become. So when the inevitable moment of sorrow is effectively captured we mourn the loss of what might have been, cut short not just by death but by a life that for, whatever reason, veered so wildly away from the admittedly narrow and perilous path of genius it had once so gorgeously danced.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: BAD 25 All News & Info
« Reply #47 on: December 02, 2012, 01:56:22 PM »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/tv-and-radio-reviews/9715579/Michael-Jackson-Bad-25-BBC-Two-review.html

Michael Jackson: Bad 25, BBC Two, review
By James Lachno11:30PM GMT 01 Dec 2012


One day, someone will make a measured, balanced – and surely unsettling – feature-length film about Michael Jackson’s controversial personal life. Bad 25, a documentary by American director Spike Lee commemorating the 25th anniversary of Jackson’s record-breaking seventh album, is not it. This watchable two-hour film, originally screened at the Venice Film Festival (and recently abridged rather heavy-handedly for US Thanksgiving audiences), instead paid homage to Jackson the entertainer.

Lee’s approach was to do a clinical track-by-track analysis of Bad, and in doing so make a case for it being as important an album as Jackson’s glittering 1979 funk-soul-disco record Off the Wall and the gazillion-selling R&B and pop follow-up Thriller (1982). To this end, Lee succeeded, often in an entertaining way. His interviews with the people behind Bad, from keyboardist Greg Phillinganes to video director Martin Scorsese, revealed snippets of fun information – that the album was to be called Smooth Criminal but master-producer Quincy Jones hated the name, that Jackson’s ‘shamon’ yelp was a tribute to Sixties soul singer Mavis Staples. Meanwhile, everyone from Stevie Wonder to

Justin Bieber offered their unqualified praise for the album’s songs.

And quite right, too. Bad, though it did not go on to sell as many copies as Thriller – it’s a lowly fifth on the all-time best-selling albums list to Thriller’s first – was a record-breaker in its own right, becoming the first album to spawn five consecutive US number one singles. It was also the first solo album where Jackson was the dominant songwriter, making it a definitive assertion of the American singer’s musical ability at that time. Lee should be commended for giving us a timely reminder of the album’s genius.

Footage of Jackson from the Bad era showed a driven and exceptionally hard-working person, while clips of him performing live confirmed that he was an astonishing vocalist and extraordinary dancer. But whenever someone delves into the world of the King of Pop, a tension simmers underneath. There were moments in Bad 25 which touched upon Jackson’s character and left you willing Lee to ask that extra question and delve just a little deeper.

Off the cuff comments and incidental details about Jackson brought into focus troubling issues regarding his private life, suggesting a sexual ambivalence and a childlike mentality. Former vocal coach Seth Riggs suggests Jackson’s high-pitched speaking voice was a front – “he really didn’t want to grow up, he wanted a child’s voice.”

It was revealed that during filming for the Way You Make Me Feel’s video, Jackson’s co-star was instructed to not kiss him under any circumstances, as the 29-year-old was “too shy”. A section of the film where people discussed Jackson appearing in elaborate disguises was humorous, but also heartbreaking – especially when Jackson admitted that he got “to see life the way it really is” by wearing them.
When a director finally does a forensic analysis of Jackson's life, failings and all, with the music as the side-story, there may not be a dry eye in the house. But for now, as Lee’s film allows, we can revel in the music.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: BAD 25 All News & Info
« Reply #48 on: December 06, 2012, 11:53:57 AM »
http://www.artistdirect.com/entertainment-news/article/exclusive-premiere-musicians-from-michael-jackson-s-bad-tour-recall-their-experiences/10335716

Musicians From Michael Jackson's BAD Tour Recall Their Experiences
Wed, 05 Dec 2012 09:47:26


ARTISTdirect.com is pleased to premiere this exclusive, 12-minute, in-depth interview clip from the 25th anniversary edition of Michael Jackson's Bad.

The footage features the live musicians who performed and played instruments like guitar, drums and keyboards on the BAD tour, recalling and reflecting on life on the road.

Grab some popcorn, a 12 oz. Dr. Pepper and enjoy this clip, as the artists who experienced it give their perspective on one of the most memorable and important tours of the modern era. They were there; they lived it. So hear it from the horse's mouth, so to speak.