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Author Topic: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live.. Case Dropped 10 Sept 2012  (Read 3630 times)

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Ben971

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Insurer seeks to void policy for Jackson shows

By ANTHONY McCARTNEY, AP Entertainment Writer – Mon Jun 6, 7:08 pm ET

LOS ANGELES – The insurer of Michael Jackson's canceled comeback concerts has asked a judge to nullify a policy intended to protect concert promoters if the singer wasn't able to complete the shows.

Lloyd's of London sued AEG Live and Jackson's company on Monday, claiming the concert promoter has failed to provide necessary medical information and details about the physician charged with the singer's death.

Lloyd's issued a non-appearance and concert cancellation policy in April 2009 — roughly two months before the pop superstar died. It was issued under an alias, "Mark Jones" and was supposed to cover up to $17.5 million in liability, according to the lawsuit.

The promoter should have informed Lloyd's what it knew about the singer's medical history, "including but not limited to, his apparent prescription drug use and/or drug addiction," the suit states.

Within days of the singer's death, an attorney for AEG submitted a claim with Jackson's death certificate, the suit claims.

The insurer states a medical exam of Jackson required by the policy was never conducted, and that they should not have to pay out for the canceled shows scheduled for London's O2 arena.

An email message seeking comment from AEG spokesman Michael Roth was not immediately returned.

Lloyd's lawsuit claims it has been seeking certain information from AEG about Jackson and his personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, since December 2009.

Murray is scheduled to go on trial later this year for involuntary manslaughter in connection with Jackson's death. Authorities claim he administered a lethal dose of the anesthetic propofol to Jackson in the bedroom of his rented mansion, although Murray has pleaded not guilty and his attorneys have said he did not give the singer anything that should have killed him.

The cost of canceling the London shows was one of the major debts facing Jackson's estate after his death.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110606/ap_en_ot/us_michael_jackson_insurance_suit
« Last Edit: September 13, 2012, 08:28:29 PM by moonstreet »

LastTear

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Re: Insurer seeks to void policy for Jackson shows
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2011, 09:40:30 PM »
6/11/2011
Lloyds vs. AEG Live and The Michael Jackson Company
 
As the media reported, the Lloyds sued both AEG Live and The Michael Jackson Company this week. Below you may read some details about the case:

- Lloyds and AEG started negotiations for a while about the insurance payments due to MJ's death. But according to Lloyds, AEG refused to handle important documents and informations to them regarding MJ, AEG and Conrad Murray. Therefore Lloyds is not willing to pay any money, or not the full amount.

- The insurance agreement refers to MJ as "Mark Jones" and to his company as "The Mark Jones Company LLC" for privacy reasons.

- Interstingly the agreement was about 30 concerts, therefore MJ planned way more than 10 concerts from the very beginnings. That doesn't support the claims that MJ has been pushed into more concerts without his knowledge.

- According to the agreement there were some restrictions, like Lloyds' representatives should have seen MJ on one of the London rehearsals, as well to see his medical reports. That finally never took place.

- According to the papers MJ hasn't visited any doctors since his 2005 trial than "cosmetic doctors".

- The insurance agreement details how the stage would have been look like, and it's moving parts. As well it lists all the team members appearing on stage.

- It's been planned the MJ will live in a rented place paid by AEG Live UK. He would have been move by 2-3 cars, and the travel time would take 20 to 60 minutes depending on the traffic. He would have been accompanied by Karen Faye, Conrad Murray and his children on occasions. Plus 2-3 bodyguards.

- MJ would have been arrive to the UK on or around 4th of July, 2009 by a private chart. The first rehearsal would have been on the 8th, of July.

- AEG expected 43 million USD in incomes after the first 30 shows.

- MJ did not agree to any "meet and greets" kind of parties.

- Dr. Tohme Tohme was also covered by the policy.

http://lesliemjhu.blogspot.com

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Insurers to see Jackson medical records
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2011, 02:22:43 PM »
http://news.yahoo.com/insurers-see-jackson-medical-records-034027198.html

Insurers to see Jackson medical records
AFP – Thu, Dec 1, 2011


Insurers for Michael Jackson's ill-fated London comeback shows can study some of the star's medical records, a US judge has said in a ruling that could affect a payout over his death.

Lawyers for the King of Pop's estate will get access to the records from medical providers and can show them to lawyers from Lloyd's of London, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Malcolm Mackey ruled.

Lloyd's, which is resisting paying out on a policy worth about £11.2 million because it did not know that Jackson was taking drugs before his death more than two years ago at the age of 50, filed suit against tour promoter AEG in June.

Attorneys for the Jackson estate and for Lloyd's will both decide which of the medical records are relevant to the case and ask Mackey to mediate in any dispute.

The legal move came days after Jackson's doctor Conrad Murray was jailed for the maximum four years following his conviction for involuntary manslaughter. He is expected to serve less than half the sentence due to California laws linked to overcrowding and budget concerns.

A six-week trial heard evidence from a number of witnesses about the various drugs Jackson was allegedly taking at least in the months before he died, including the anesthetic propofol.

Jackson died on June 25, 2009 from an overdose of propofol and other sedatives, administered by Murray in an attempt to help the star sleep while in Los Angeles, where he was rehearsing for his "This is It" comeback tour.

The trial also heard claims that Jackson, battling to resurrect his career from child molestation charges that left him with huge financial debts, stood to make close to £64 million from the 50 planned concerts.

Lloyd's wants Mackey to rule that it does not have to pay out on the AEG insurance policy because it was not told about Jackson's drug problems when the contract was signed.

Lloyd's attorney Paul Schreiffer said Jackson waived any privacy rights he might have asserted before he died by signing an agreement for his medical records to be produced for the company.

Schrieffer said the ruling should help move the case forward, adding that Lloyd's has sought the medical information for more than two years.

Lloyd's issued subpoenas for the records on July 12, including two directed at Beverly Hills dermatologist Dr Arnold Klein and
Dr Allan Metzger, who accompanied Jackson on a tour in the 1990s.

The Lloyd's lawsuit against AEG claims the promoter did not tell the insurer about the singer's medical history, "including, but not limited to, his apparent prescription drug use and/or drug addiction."

The company also alleges AEG did not disclose the star's use of propofol.

"There is evidence to suggest that Michael Jackson had a history of narcotic use, including but not limited to Demerol and propofol, the use of which may have resulted in his death, the Lloyd's court papers say.

"Dr Klein was a (dermatologist) for Michael Jackson who administered Demerol to Jackson reportedly on a regular basis."

The trial heard how Jackson would emerge from Dr Klein's office drowsy and slurring his speech. In a chilling audio recording played in court the star was barely comprehensible, talking about his hopes for the London shows.

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Insurance Lloyd's of London V AEG
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2012, 11:33:45 PM »
http://www.wavenewspapers.com/entertainment/Judge-issues-favorable-ruling-for-insurers-of-Jacksons-comeback-tour-136754403.html

JUDGE ISSUES FAVORABLE RULING FOR INSURERS OF JACKSON'S ILL-FATED TOUR

The insurers of Michael Jackson's attempted comeback concerts won a round in court Thursday when a judge said the company can begin collecting information from the promoters of the singer's attempted 2009 comeback tour.
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Malcolm Mackey denied a motion by AEG Live asking that a lawsuit by Lloyd's of London be put on hold until two other legal actions by the mother and father of the late singer concerning his death are concluded.
 
Mackey also said he will delay setting a trial date and appoint an evidence referee to make recommendations to him in case any disputes arise between the two sides in exchanging information.
 
"I know this is a multi-faceted case and I think that somewhere it's going to settle way down the line," Mackey said. "For what, I don't know."
 
Attorney Paul Schrieffer, on behalf of Lloyd's, criticized AEG Live's motion. He said his clients have waited for more than two years to get the documents they need and that any such motion should have been brought months earlier.
 
"Now they have the epiphany to come into this court and ask for a stay in this case," he said.
 
After the hearing, Schrieffer said he was pleased that the motion was denied. He also said he would be agreeable to the cases by Katherine and Joe Jackson being tried ahead of the Lloyd's case so long as his clients continue to get their information from AEG Live.
 
Lloyd's filed suit against AEG Live and the Michael Jackson Co. LLC last June. Lloyd's wants a judge to declare it does not have to pay AEG's $17.5 million policy on grounds the insurers were not told the singer was taking drugs before he died of a drug overdose on June 25, 2009, at age 50.
 
The Lloyd's lawsuit against AEG claims the company did not tell the insurer about the singer's medical history, "including, but not limited to, his apparent prescription drug use and/or drug addiction."  The company also alleges AEG did not disclose the star's use of propofol, a powerful anesthetic normally used in a hospital setting.
 
The late pop star's personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter last year in the death of Jackson, who died of acute propofol intoxication. The physician was sentenced to four years in prison, but is expected to spend about half that time behind bars.
 
Murray administered the final dose to Jackson at his rented mansion to help him sleep, then failed to monitor the singer, according to trial testimony.
 
Lloyd's was never told that the singer was missing rehearsals and appearing at meetings with slurred speech after visiting the office of Dr. Arnold Klein, the singer's dermatologist, according to the Lloyd's attorneys' court documents.
 
Up until the last day of Jackson's life, Lloyd's executives were asking for Jackson's medical information from AEG Live's lawyer, who in turn was passing those requests to Murray, according to the Lloyd's attorneys' court papers.
 
In their suits, Katherine Jackson is suing AEG Live for the alleged negligent hiring of Murray. The case is scheduled for trial in September.
 
Joe Jackson's complaint names both Murray and AEG Live. No trial date is set.
 
Attorney Marvin Putnam, on behalf of AEG Live, said the company is not interested in settling either case.
 
"These are just shakedowns of my clients," he said.



Offline moonstreet

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2012, 11:46:11 AM »
http://www.thecmuwebsite.com/article/michael-jacksons-death-continues-to-keep-the-us-courts-busy/

Monday January 9th, 2012 11:37
Michael Jackson’s death continues to keep the US courts busy


It may be a new year, but still the fall out from the 2009 death of Michael Jackson rumbles on. And first up, the insurer of the late king of pop’s ill-fated ‘This Is It’ residency at London’s The O2 has successfully fought off efforts by the show’s promoter, AEG Live, to stop the firm getting its hands on paperwork relating to the cancelled venture.

As previously reported, Lloyds Of London is trying to get out of paying AEG $17.5 million to cover some of the costs the live firm incurred by having to cancel the ‘This Is It’ season after Jackson’s sudden demise due to a drug overdose. Lloyds claims that AEG failed to provide key information about Jackson’s medical condition, and his routine use of prescription medication, when taking out its insurance policy, thus rendering the agreement void. AEG does not concur.

When Lloyds went legal last June one of its complaints was that AEG had been withholding key documents that the insurer needs in order to assess the live firm’s conduct when applying for insurance cover in early 2009.

Responding to the lawsuit late last year, AEG asked the judge hearing the case that he delay all proceedings relating to the Lloyds litigation – including the handing over of any documents – until after the conclusion of two other lawsuits relating to Michael Jackson’s death, those being brought by both of the singer’s parents against AEG. Katherine and Joe Jackson claim the promoter is in part liable for their son’s demise because it hired Conrad Murray, the doctor who, the criminal courts have ruled, caused Michael Jackson’s death through negligence.

Considering that motion last week, Judge Malcolm Mackey said that he was happy to delay the actual court hearing for the Lloyds case until after the Jacksons v AEG cases, but that didn’t mean the live music firm couldn’t hand over the documents the insurer requires to prepare its case in the meantime. He also appointed a referee to oversee the document exchange process.

Lloyds says it doesn’t have a problem with the actual court hearing regarding its litigation being delayed until after the Jacksons v AEG cases, but welcomed Mackey’s decision to grant access to all important documents in the meantime. It remains to be seen what course this squabble now takes, Mackey actually predicted this dispute would ultimately be settled out of court before any hearing could actually take place.

Elsewhere, and back to Murray himself, and the doctor has been asked to return his medical licence to the Californian Medical Board, as the body prepares to fully revoke it. Murray was licensed to practice medicine in three states, Nevada and Texas as well as California. After Jackson’s death, he was allowed to continue to practice in Nevada and Texas, though the medical board of the latter banned him from administering anaesthetics. According to Reuters, the Nevada Medical Board is now also going through the process of revoking Murray’s licence, though it’s unclear what the position is in Texas.

Though, of course, Murray is currently serving a four year jail sentence, so is unable to use any licences in the short term anyway. And legal matters relating to medical licences are probably the last of Murray’s worries at the moment, given that he’s hoping to appeal his criminal conviction, plus there’s still the matter of restitution and the aforementioned Katherine and Joe Jackson lawsuits to deal with.

And as of last week another lawsuit too, launched by a 100 of the late king of pop’s fans who are suing for the “emotional damage” they suffered as a result of Jackson’s death. It’s an optimistic bit of litigation, but the lawyer representing the fans told the AFP: “It’s similar to losing a childhood friend in a traffic accident. Because this death affects you, you have the possibility to file a suit and seek compensation”. And before you start musing to yourself “those crazy Yanks”, we should note the emotionally damaged and rather litigious Jackson fans are French.

So, more gloom for Murray. Though if it’s any compensation to the incarcerated medic, the other doctor he believes should accept some responsibility for Michael Jackson’s demise isn’t having that great a time of it either. As previously reported, Murray’s legal team reckons Jackson was addicted to prescription painkiller medication, which they say he received – unbeknownst to Murray at the time – from his long term friend and dermatologist Dr Arnold Klein.

It was that addiction, fed by Klein, Team Murray alleged, that resulted in Jackson suffering from acute insomnia, in turn resulting in their client administering the fatal dose of propofol. The allegations were never tested in court, though, because the judge hearing Murray’s case deemed them irrelevant (not least because the painkiller in question wasn’t in Jackson’s system at the time of his death), and the dermatologist was not even called to testify. Nor has he been charged for any misconduct.

But the claims have nevertheless circulated outside the courtroom and, according to various newspaper reports, it’s had a hugely detrimental affect on Klein’s business, meaning he now makes in the region of $500 a day, rather than demanding daily fees of $25,000. Of course $2500 a week is still an OK salary, but not when you’re used to a millionaire’s lifestyle as dermatologist to the stars, and as a result the doctor now faces bankruptcy and has had to turn to celebrity friends for help to cover his legal costs.

That said, Klein claims that his current financial meltdown, although in part caused by unproven allegations regarding his treatment of Jackson, is really the result of his business associates embezzling millions of his money over the years, and some of his legal costs are being run up suing those associates. Though those accused of embezzlement, including the doctor’s accountant Muhammad Khilji, deny any wrong doing, and say that the situation has occurred because Klein continued to live a millionaire’s lifestyle even after his business collapsed following the death of Michael Jackson.

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2012, 10:19:00 AM »
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-aeg-jackson-20120902,0,6711027.story

Doubts surfaced early on Michael Jackson
Emails in Jackson insurance litigation show AEG execs knew of concerns about the pop star's stability.
By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
September 2, 2012


The scene in Michael Jackson's London hotel suite left Randy Phillips in a panic. Phillips was one of the world's most powerful music promoters and used to rock 'n' roll chaos, but the star's condition still floored him.

"MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent," Phillips said in an email to his boss at Anschutz Entertainment Group, the Los Angeles company staking a fortune on the singer. "I [am] trying to sober him up."

Across the Atlantic, where it was still early morning, AEG President Tim Leiweke read the message and fired back on his BlackBerry: "Are you kidding me?"

"I screamed at him so loud the walls are shaking," Phillips told him. "He is an emotionally paralyzed mess riddled with self loathing and doubt now that it is show time."

The story of Jackson's ill-fated comeback attempt has been told in news reports, a manslaughter trial and a feature-length documentary. But a cache of confidential AEG emails obtained by The Times offers a darker picture of the relationship between the down-on-his-luck idol and the buttoned-up corporation taking a bet on his erratic talents.

The 250 pages of messages illuminate the extent to which top executives were aware of doubts about Jackson's stability as they prepared for his 50-show concert run at their London arena.

The emails will probably play a central role in two lawsuits set for trial next year. The shows' insurers are asking a judge to nullify a $17.5-million policy that they say AEG got with false claims about Jackson's health and readiness to perform. Jackson's heirs are pressing a wrongful-death suit that accuses AEG of pressuring the pop star to carry on with a comeback despite indications he was too weak.

Lawyers for AEG, which has denied any wrongdoing, said most of the correspondence was produced as discovery in ongoing litigation. They said the messages reviewed by The Times were incomplete and leaked to portray the company in a negative light. The lawyers declined to provide additional emails that they said would give a fuller picture, citing a protective order imposed by a judge in the civil litigation.

"If you are in the creative arts business, you are going to be involved with individuals who have a great many problems," said AEG attorney Marvin Putnam. "Michael Jackson was an adult and … it is supercilious to say he was unable to take care of his own affairs."

Michael Jackson was a megastar but also had a trail of burned investors and canceled performances that loomed large when AEG began contemplating a deal with him in the fall of 2008.

Even before meeting with Jackson, executives at the highest levels of AEG, including billionaire founder Phil Anschutz, were seeking insurance to protect the company's bottom line if the shows didn't come off, according to the emails.

Anschutz invited Jackson to a meeting at a Las Vegas villa in September 2008. Paul Gongaware, an AEG Live executive who knew Jackson, emailed colleagues a strategy memo. Wear casual clothes, he told them, "as MJ is distrustful of people in suits" and expect to talk "fluff" with "Mikey."

The company was proposing a world tour that would net the cash-strapped star $132 million, according to the memo. "This is not a number that MJ will want to hear. He thinks he is so much bigger than that," Gongaware warned. Talk in terms of gross receipts, he suggested.

The singer and AEG signed a deal in January 2009. According to the contract, AEG agreed to bankroll a series of London concerts at its 02 Arena and Jackson promised "a first-class performance." If he reneged, AEG would take control of the debt-ridden singer's company and use the income from his music catalogs to recoup its money.

There were doubters inside and outside the company. Dan Beckerman, AEG's chief operating officer, sent Phillips, the chief executive of concert division AEG Live, a YouTube link to Jackson's shaky 2001 MTV appearance and asked, "Can he pull this off?"

"With time and rehearsal," Phillips wrote back.

Pressed by another promoter about Jackson's ability to deliver, Phillips shot back in an email, "He has to or financial disaster awaits."

The contract required a medical examination as part of AEG's effort to get cancellation insurance, and nine days after Jackson signed, a New York doctor went to the star's Holmby Hills mansion. Dr. David Slavit concluded that Jackson was in "excellent condition," an assessment that AEG would tout in the coming months as proof that their star was healthy.

It's unclear how thorough the exam was. Slavit, an ear, nose and throat doctor who listed his specialty as "care of the professional voice," wrote extensively about Jackson's vocal cords in his report, which AEG said was given to its insurance broker. But he was silent on Jackson's well-documented substance abuse problems.

The singer had dropped out of at least one tour for drug treatment, but Slavit wrote that past cancellations were "related to dehydration and exhaustion."

Asked on a questionnaire in the report whether he had "ever been treated for or had any indication of excessive use of alcohol or drugs," Jackson circled "no."

AEG planned to announce Jackson's comeback in March with a London news conference. But as the date drew near, Jackson dropped out of sight. Inside AEG, there was growing fear.

"We are holding all the risk," Gongaware wrote to Phillips. "We let Mikey know just what this will cost him in terms of him making money.... We cannot be forced into stopping this, which MJ will try to do because he is lazy and constantly changes his mind to fit his immediate wants."

He is locked. He has no choice … he signed a contract," Gongaware wrote.

Publicly, AEG projected confidence. "The man is very sane, the man is very focused, the man is very healthy," Leiweke assured a music industry symposium the day before the news conference.

Jackson made it to London, but according to emails Phillips sent to Leiweke, the star was intoxicated and refused to leave his suite. In the end, the emails show, Phillips and Jackson's manager had to dress him.

"He is scared to death," Phillips wrote to Leiweke.

In an interview, AEG's attorney Putnam suggested Phillips had exaggerated in his emails and said Jackson's behavior appeared to be a case of "nerves."

Jackson arrived 90 minutes late for the news conference and his brief comments struck some of the 350 reporters gathered as disjointed and strange. Still, fan enthusiasm was undeniable: Demand for an initial 10 shows crashed Ticketmaster's servers.

Two months later, Jackson and AEG got insurance from Lloyd's of London, according to the policy that is contained in court records. For rehearsals in L.A., it only covered accidents. The policy would expand to include illness and death coverage when Jackson got to London and was evaluated by Lloyd's doctors there.

AEG officials first met Dr. Conrad Murray during May rehearsals. In the trial last year that ended with Murray's manslaughter conviction, witnesses testified that Jackson insisted that AEG hire the doctor as his personal physician for the London shows at $150,000 a month.

Murray, who was deep in debt and in danger of losing his home, was giving Jackson nightly doses of propofol, a powerful surgical anesthetic, for his chronic insomnia, according to the doctor's statement to police.

In an interview, AEG's lawyers noted that none of the emails referred to propofol and said no one at the company knew about Murray's use of it. Jackson died before signing Murray's contract, and the doctor was never paid by AEG.

Those rehearsing with Jackson began sounding alarms in mid-June, according to the emails, a month before his scheduled debut in London. They complained he missed rehearsals, was slow picking up routines and would have to lip-sync some of his signature numbers.

"MJ is not in shape enough yet to sing this stuff live and dance at the same time," the show's musical director informed supervisors in an email. Jackson missed another week of rehearsals, and when he finally showed up June 19, he was too weak to perform.

Emails reviewed by The Times show far greater alarm about Jackson's mental state than has emerged previously.

"He was a basket case," a production manager wrote. "Doubt is pervasive."

"We have a real problem here," Phillips wrote to Leiweke.

The show's director, Kenny Ortega, told Phillips their star was not ready for the comeback and called for a psychiatric intervention: "There are strong signs of paranoia, anxiety and obsessive-like behavior. I think the very best thing we can do is get a top Psychiatrist in to evaluate him ASAP.

"It is like there are two people there. One (deep inside) trying to hold on to what he was and still can be and not wanting us to quit him, the other in this weakened and troubled state," wrote Ortega, who had known Jackson for 20 years. "I believe we need professional guidance in this matter."

Phillips resisted the request for immediate psychiatric intervention. "It is critical that neither you, me or anyone around this show become amateur psychiatrists or physicians," Phillips wrote.

He added that Murray, "who I am gaining immense respect for as I get to deal with him more," was confident the singer was ready.

"This doctor is extremely successful (we check everyone out) and does not need this gig so he [is] totally unbiased and ethical," Phillips wrote.

At a meeting that day, Jackson vowed to improve, and Murray said he would help. By all accounts, the next two days of rehearsals — the last of Jackson's life — were superb.

In the recent interview, AEG's lawyer said the company responded responsibly to concerns raised by Ortega and others by monitoring rehearsals and consulting Jackson and his physician.

"Michael and the doctor stressed that he was OK. They had it under control," Putnam said.

Numerous emails show that at the same time, Lloyd's of London was pressing AEG to schedule a complete medical examination for Jackson. The insurance company had to be convinced the singer was healthy before they would expand the policy to include illness and death, crucial coverage given reports from rehearsals.

That four-hour exam by Lloyd's in London would include three doctors, heart monitoring and blood work. AEG's insurance broker tried to persuade Lloyd's to drop the physical, according to the email discussions by AEG officials. AEG suggested Murray could provide an oral recitation of Jackson's recent medical history instead. Lloyd's refused.

Since agreeing to the policy in May, Lloyd's had sought additional information from AEG — medical records, details about Jackson's daily fitness program and responses to media reports about his health.

"Always with no response," a Lloyd's underwriter wrote.

Lloyd's also insisted on five years of medical records. The insurance company wrote that it wanted a thorough account for all doctor's appointments, hospital visits and cosmetic procedures since 2003.

Within AEG, it was determined that Murray was the best hope to get the records, and in the final week of Jackson's life, officials sent at least 10 emails reminding him to gather them.

Murray responded to the last of the requests June 25 in Jackson's darkened bedroom suite, according to emails presented at the doctor's criminal trial. He wrote that he had talked to Jackson and "Authorization was denied,"

Less than an hour later, Jackson stopped breathing, according to a timeline Murray gave police.

A week later, AEG filed a claim for the entire $17.5-million insurance policy and said publicly that it was out more than $35 million.

But within a very short period, it became clear that Jackson's demise, however terrible for those who loved him, was a commercial boon for his heirs and for AEG.

The celebratory documentary "This Is It," which AEG co-produced alone grossed more than $260 million worldwide.

"Michael's death is a terrible tragedy, but life must go on. AEG will make a fortune from merch sales, ticket retention, the touring exhibition and the film/dvd," Phillips wrote to a concert business colleague in August, adding, "I still wish he was here!"

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2012, 11:02:08 PM »
 :getmurray: :murray: :murray: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: AEG hoodwinked everyone! I wan t my money back from the dvd! i know it is doubtful but they lied their butts off in the interviews promoting This is It as well as documentaries about Michael and his life. Where's a petition? I want to voice my displeasure. Damn AEG! They should be Murray's cell mates! :murrayjail: :murrayjail: :murrayjail: :murray: :murray: :murray:

Offline moonstreet

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2012, 09:30:13 AM »
http://www.showbiz411.com/2012/09/03/michael-jackson-lawyers-may-ask-court-for-sanctions-over-leaked-emails

Michael Jackson Lawyers May Ask Court for Sanctions over Leaked Emails
09/03/12 11:31pmRoger Friedman


The lawyers for AEGLive, the company being sued by Michael Jackson’s family for his alleged wrongful death, are fuming. I am told they may ask the court for sanctions against the Jackson family and their attorneys as early as Tuesday over emails that were leaked to the Los Angeles Times last week. The emails, which the Times published, were sealed as part of the wrongful death suit as evidence. The court case won’t be heard until next year.

But my sources say that the Jacksons, desperate for money after their failed attempt to snatch Katherine Jackson this summer, are looking for sympathy in the court of public opinion. I’m told they selectively pulled a few mails from hundreds and turned them over to the Los Angeles Times in an effort to make AEGLive look guilty of somehow forcing Michael to perform 50 concerts in London.
The truth when the totality of the emails is uncovered in court will be quite different. Michael Jackson was in deep debt when AEG first proposed he do 10 shows at the O2 Arena. That was in the fall of 2008. Jackson waffled. But eventually he was persuaded to agree simply because he had no choice. In practical terms, he was broke. AEG offered him an easy way to make some decent money and get back on his feet.

One thing is true: on the way to the O2 Arena announcement in March 2009, Jackson freaked out. He got ripping drunk. The result can be seen in the video of the announcement. Michael is grinning from ear to ear, laughing, and has no idea what to say other than “This is it.” On the way to the announcement from London, he was petrified. He was very late arriving at the Arena, as well, making everyone wait.
What the LA Times has discounted is the documentary, “This Is It.” For as much as Michael was petulant, stubborn, lazy, scared, etc, he was also a perfectionist with certain specific abilities. The latter are seen in the film at the rehearsals that he did show up for. And no one at AEG Live was trying to kill him, or overwork him to the point of exhaustion. AEG wanted Michael to succeed. They let him handpick everyone from Dr. Conrad Murray to his chef to trainers etc.

Let’s not forget: on May 5th, 2009 Kevin Spacey’s former manager Joanne Horowitz ran into Michael at Dr. Arnold Klein’s office. Michael was in great shape and looking forward to the tour. (Link follows.) Jackson’s mental and physical status changed on a daily basis as the London shows loomed. Like any performer, there were days when he was excited and others when he was apprehensive.
read: http://www.showbiz411.com/2009/07/01/20090701Jackson-michael-jackson-joanne-horowitz-studio-54-arnold-klein

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2012, 04:09:41 PM »
http://edition.cnn.com/2012/09/06/showbiz/michael-jackson-leak/index.html

Source of leaked Michael Jackson e-mails identified
By Alan Duke, CNN
September 6, 2012 -- Updated 0855 GMT (1655 HKT
)

Los Angeles (CNN) -- Dramatic e-mails about Michael Jackson's condition before his death were leaked to a reporter by a businessman who just settled a copyright lawsuit with Jackson's estate, that businessman told CNN.

The admission by Howard Mann that he provided the controversial documents to the Los Angeles Times contradicts a claim by lawyers for concert promoter AEG Live that they have "unequivocal evidence" showing that Jackson's mother and her lawyers leaked the e-mails.

The source of the leak is crucial to the wrongful death lawsuit filed by Katherine Jackson and the late pop star's three children since the judge in the case ordered the documents sealed.

AEG's lawyers filed a motion Monday asking the judge to impose tough sanctions on the Jacksons, including fines and preventing them from using the e-mails as evidence in their effort to prove the promoter contributed to Jackson's death as he prepared for comeback concerts in 2009.

AEG did not immediately respond to CNN's request for comment about Mann's claim of responsibility for the leak.

"We were able to learn today that apparently Howard Mann has admitted that he was the source, and that he definitely never received any documents from Katherine, Prince, Paris, or Blanket Jackson, nor from their lawyers in the wrongful death suit against AEG," said Jackson lawyer Kevin Boyle.

Boyle criticized AEG's lawyers for their haste in pointing the finger at the Jacksons.

"AEG made these accusations against the Jackson family and their lawyers apparently without doing even the most rudimentary investigation," Boyle said. "We are further disturbed that the motion for sanctions filed by AEG was given to the press before it was served on Katherine Jackson or her counsel."

If the AEG lawyers had reached out to the Jackson lawyers earlier, they could have helped solve the mystery of the leaked documents, he said.

"AEG has known about the alleged leak since a week before the article was published," Boyle said. "AEG never contacted the Jackson's counsel to inquire about the article or the documents."

The e-mails revealed the promoter for Jackson's "This Is It" concerts expressed doubts about the star's ability to be ready for the shows but expressed confidence in the private doctor eventually convicted in Jackson's death.

AEG Live President Randy Phillips was responding to show director Kenny Ortega's e-mail, which said Jackson had "strong signs of paranoia, anxiety and obsessive-like behavior" and suggesting they hire a "top Psychiatrist in to evaluate him ASAP."

Jackson died on June 25, 2009, from what the Los Angeles County coroner ruled was an overdose of a surgical anesthetic and sedatives, drugs that Dr. Conrad Murray told police he used to help the entertainer sleep as he prepared for the concerts set to start two weeks later.
Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to four years in prison last year.

Mann, who once partnered with Katherine Jackson on a book and documentary about her family, said he obtained the documents from various sources, but none of them came from the Jacksons or their lawyers.

He gave them to reporter Harriet Ryan because he wanted the story of Jackson's death to be told, Mann said. Mann's company settled a copyright dispute with Jackson's estate over use of Jackson's images this week.

Ryan, who kept the source of the documents secret in her story, did not immediately respond to CNN requests for comment on Mann's claim that he gave them to her.

AEG lawyer Marvin Putnam went on a public relations and legal offensive against Katherine Jackson and her lawyers this week in response to Ryan's article and the subsequent stories by other news outlets, including CNN.

"AEG believes the unequivocal evidence shows that Katherine Jackson and her attorneys leaked these documents to the press," he said in a statement to CNN. "The documents released to the press were given to Mrs. Jackson and her attorneys -- and to no one else -- confidentially in discovery and subject to a court order."

But Mann said he got the e-mails from several sources, including Jackson fans who contacted him. Some of the documents were part of discovery in other cases, including the criminal trial of Dr. Murray, he said.

Boyle, the Jackson lawyer, also told CNN that other parties had the same documents, including lawyers involved in an ongoing insurance case against AEG.

Lloyds of London seeks to void a $17.5 million policy that AEG purchased in case Jackson was not able to perform the 50 shows scheduled for London's O2 Arena. The insurer contends AEG hid Jackson's health problems and failed to respond to repeated requests for his medical history.

"Katherine, Prince, Paris and Blanket Jackson and their lawyers deny AEG's allegations that we gave any protected documents to the press," Boyle said.

The documents made public in the Los Angeles Times story are not the most damaging to AEG that were uncovered, Boyle said.

"We can assure you that we are in possession of documents that make for an extremely compelling story in the wrongful death case, and that completely support the plaintiffs' claims," he said.

AEG Live's president called Jackson's death "a terrible tragedy" in an e-mail weeks after he died, he added "but life must go on."

"AEG will make a fortune from merch sales, ticket retention, the touring exhibition and the film/dvd," Phillips wrote. In fact, AEG Live was allowed to sell Jackson tour merchandise and share in the profits from the documentary "This Is It," produced from rehearsal video.

The e-mails suggest AEG Live's president saw Jackson's problems first hand the day the pop star was to appear at the O2 Arena to publicly announce the shows.

"MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent," Phillips wrote in a March 5, 2009, e-mail to AEG Live's parent company, the paper reported. "I (am) trying to sober him up."

"I screamed at him so loud the walls are shaking," Phillips wrote. "He is an emotionally paralyzed mess riddled with self loathing and doubt now that it is show time."

The promoter blamed London traffic when Jackson was 90 minutes late for the announcement that day.

"He's as healthy as he can be -- no health problems whatsoever," Phillips told CNN two months later to refute reports Jackson's health was threatening the concerts.

The Los Angeles Times story, however, said the e-mails indicated major doubts about Jackson's ability to perform.

"We cannot be forced into stopping this, which MJ will try to do because he is lazy and constantly changes his mind to fit his immediate wants," AEG Live executive Paul Gongaware e-mailed to Phillips.

Jackson's missed rehearsals in June triggered concerns in e-mails that he was slow in learning his dance routines and would have to lip-sync on stage, the newspaper reported.

"MJ is not in shape enough yet to sing this stuff live and dance at the same time," one e-mail from the show's music director read, the paper reported.

A production manager wrote: "He was a basket case. Doubt is pervasive."

A loud warning from Ortega, who worked closely with Jackson on previous tours, came in mid-June, just over a week before his death.

"It is like there are two people there. One (deep inside) trying to hold on to what he was and still can be and not wanting us to quit him, the other in this weakened and troubled state," Ortega wrote. "I believe we need professional guidance in this matter."

testified at Murray's trial about his concerns about Jackson's frail condition and missed rehearsals. It resulted in a meeting six days before Jackson's death in which Murray assured the promoters he would have Jackson ready for rehearsals that next week.

An e-mail from Phillips after that meeting said he had confidence in Murray "who I am gaining immense respect for as I get to deal with him more."

"This doctor is extremely successful (we check everyone out) and does not need this gig, so he (is) totally unbiased and ethical," Phillips' e-mail said.

The correspondence could play a role in the wrongful death lawsuit, which accuses the promoter of contributing to his death by pressuring him to prepare for the concerts despite his weak condition.

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2012, 08:13:37 PM »
http://www.pollstar.com/news_article.aspx?ID=802647


AEG Returns Fire In MJ Email Leak
12:01 PM Friday 9/7/12


Michael Jackson was an “emotionally paralyzed mess” who was “drunk and despondent” before his 2009 London press conference announcing the ill-fated “This Is It” concert residency, according to one of a series of leaked emails written by AEG Live CEO Randy Phillips to AEG President/CEO Tim Leiweke.

The confidential emails, as leaked to the Los Angeles Times, paint a picture of Jackson as unstable, out of shape and terrified of the upcoming run of 50 concerts at London’s O2 arena that were to begin in September 2009.

He died of acute Propofol poisoning June 25, a week before his scheduled departure from Los Angeles and his physican, Dr. Conrad Murray, was subsequently convicted of manslaughter in the superstar’s death. Jackson’s mother, Katherine, has since filed a wrongful death lawsuit against AEG.

Marvin Putnam, an attorney for AEG, contends the emails were illegally leaked by Katherine Jackson or her legal team in violation of a court order in the case and, in any event, were reported “horrendously” out of context.

AEG fired back three days after the story’s publication, filing motions in the Jackson suit demanding monetary and other sanctions against Katherine for violating the court’s order that sealed the emails – some 250 of which were obtained by the Times.

The motion also seeks evidentiary sanctions, including a prohibition on the use of any leaked document “in connection with any motion filed before the Court or at trial.”

“AEG believes the unequivocal evidence shows that Katherine Jackson and her attorneys leaked these documents to the press,” Putnam said.

“The documents released to the press were given to Mrs. Jackson and her attorneys – and to no one else – confidentially in discovery and subject to a court order. Accordingly, AEG has filed a motion for sanctions against Mrs. Jackson and her counsel for this unlawful leak.”

And because nothing is ever uncomplicated where the Jackson family is concerned, CNN reported the following day that a businessman with a recently settled copyright suit against the Jackson estate has stepped up to claim responsibility for the leak – and that Katherine Jackson was falsely accused by AEG.

Howard Mann’s admission to CNN that he provided the emails contradicts AEG’s contention that only Katherine could have provided the documents to the Times. However, it isn’t clear how Mann could have obtained them or how they were relevant to a copyright case. He told CNN he got them from several sources, including MJ fans.

Jackson attorney Kevin Boyle lambasted AEG for accusing Katherine of being the source of the leak.
“AEG made these accusations against the Jackson family and their lawyers apparently without doing even the most rudimentary investigation,”

Boyle told CNN. “We are further disturbed that the motion for sanctions filed by AEG was given to the press before it was served on Katherine Jackson or her counsel.”

Neither Putnam nor AEG spokesman Michael Roth responded immediately to Pollstar’s request for a response to the CNN interview.

The emails reported by the Times, taken alone, could provide potent ammo for Jackson against AEG, according to some legal observers. Some cast Phillips and Leiweke in a less than flattering light. And insurer Lloyd’s of London also has an interest, as it seeks to void a $17.5 million policy on Michael Jackson’s performance.

“If you are in the creative arts business, you are going to be involved with individuals who have a great many problems,” Putnam told
the Times.

“Michael Jackson was an adult and … it is supercilious to say he was unable to take care of his own affairs.”
But the leaked emails suggest that even AEG had questions about MJ’s fitness.

“MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent,” Phillips emailed Leiweke from Jackson’s London hotel room prior to the March 2009 press conference. “I [am] trying to sober him up.” Leiweke reportedly responded, “Are you kidding me?”

“I screamed at him so loud the walls are shaking,” Phillips replied. “He is an emotionally paralyzed mess riddled with self loathing and doubt now that it is show time.” Phillips and a Jackson manager had to help him dress for the press conference, where he reportedly left 350 reporters cooling their heels for 90 minutes.

Two months later, Lloyd’s of London agreed to insure the U.K. residency against illness or death although, while Jackson was rehearsing in L.A., it covered only accidents.

“This Is It” director Kenny Ortega called for a psychiatric intervention in one message. A production manager wrote of MJ, “He was a basket case. … Doubt is pervasive.” And Phillips wrote to Leiweke “ We have a real problem here.”

Some of the emails appear to suggest Phillips had warmed up to Murray, despite having not signed off on a contract for Jackson’s personal physician that called for him to be paid $150,000 per month to accompany MJ to London.

He wrote that Murray, “who I am gaining immense respect for as I get to deal with him more,” was confident of MJ’s ability to pull off the tour. “This doctor is extremely successful (we check everyone out) and does not need this gig so he [is] totally unbiased and ethical.”

Yet just an hour before Jackson died in his rented Bel Air, Calif., mansion, Murray notified Lloyd’s of MJ’s refusal to authorize the release of medical records or to submit to a thorough medical exam in order to expand his insurance coverage.

A week after Jackson’s death, AEG reportedly filed its claim on the insurance policy. AEG and Jackson’s estate have long since recouped their initial financial losses and continue to make money from ventures including the concert documentary “This Is It,” which is said to have grossed more than $260 million worldwide.

“Michael’s death is a terrible tragedy, but life must go on,” Phillips reportedly emailed a colleague two months after the singer’s passing. “AEG will make a fortune from merch sales, ticket retention, the touring exhibition and the film/dvd,” adding, “I still wish he was here!”

AEG requests a hearing on its motions against Katherine Jackson take place on or around Oct. 25.

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2012, 08:27:10 PM »
http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/10/showbiz/michael-jackson-insurance/index.html

AEG drops Michael Jackson insurance claim
By Alan Duke, CNN
updated 9:51 PM EDT, Mon September 10, 2012


Los Angeles (CNN) -- AEG dropped its claim Monday for a $17.5 million insurance policy for Michael Jackson, just days after e-mails revealed the concert promoter had doubts about Jackson's health at the time they were applying for the insurance.

AEG lawyer Marvin Putnam told CNN later Monday the move has been in the works for months and is not connected with the controversy over the e-mails.

A Lloyds of London underwriter sued AEG and Michael Jackson LLC after Jackson's death, claiming they failed to disclose information about the pop star's health and drug use.

"In exchange for AEG withdrawing its insurance claim, underwriters agreed to dismiss AEG from the case and to waive any costs recoverable from AEG," said Paul Schrieffer, attorney for the insurance underwriter. "The insurance case continues against the Michael Jackson Company LLC for, among other things, rescission of the policy due to nondisclosures of Michael Jackson's prior drug use."

The Michael Jackson estate, which controls Michael Jackson Company LLC, is still pursuing the insurance payout, its lawyer said Monday.
Jackson died of an overdose of a surgical anesthesia in combination with sedatives on June 25, 2009, according the the Los Angeles County coroner. Dr. Conrad Murray was found guilty last year of involuntary manslaughter in Jackson's death.

A controversy over the insurance claim erupted last week after the Los Angeles Times published e-mails which the insurance lawyer said had not been provided to him despite a year of discovery in the case.

Randy Phillips, the president of AEG Live -- the concert-promotion branch of AEG -- called Jackson's death "a terrible tragedy" in one e-mail written weeks after he died, adding "but life must go on."

"AEG will make a fortune from merch sales, ticket retention, the touring exhibition and the film/dvd," Phillips wrote. In fact, AEG Live was allowed to sell Jackson tour merchandise and share in the profits from the documentary "This Is It," produced from rehearsal video.

The e-mails suggest AEG Live's president saw Jackson's problems first-hand the day the pop star was to appear at the O2 Arena to publicly announce the shows.

"MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent," Phillips wrote in a March 5, 2009, e-mail to AEG Live's parent company, the paper reported. "I (am) trying to sober him up."

"I screamed at him so loud the walls are shaking," Phillips wrote. "He is an emotionally paralyzed mess riddled with self-loathing and doubt now that it is show time."

The promoter blamed London traffic when Jackson was 90 minutes late for the announcement that day.

"He's as healthy as he can be -- no health problems whatsoever," Phillips told CNN two months later to refute reports Jackson's health was threatening the concerts.

The Los Angeles Times story, however, said the e-mails indicated major doubts about Jackson's ability to perform.

"We cannot be forced into stopping this, which MJ will try to do because he is lazy and constantly changes his mind to fit his immediate wants," AEG Live executive Paul Gongaware e-mailed to Phillips.

Jackson's missed rehearsals in June triggered concerns in e-mails that he was slow in learning his dance routines and would have to lip-sync on stage, the newspaper reported.

"MJ is not in shape enough yet to sing this stuff live and dance at the same time," one e-mail from the show's music director read, the paper reported.

A production manager wrote: "He was a basket case. Doubt is pervasive."

A loud warning from show director Kenny Ortega, who worked closely with Jackson on previous tours, came in mid-June, just over a week before his death. Ortega wrote to Phillips that Jackson had "strong signs of paranoia, anxiety and obsessive-like behavior" and suggesting they bring a "top psychiatrist in to evaluate him ASAP."

"It is like there are two people there. One (deep inside) trying to hold on to what he was and still can be and not wanting us to quit him, the other in this weakened and troubled state," Ortega wrote. "I believe we need professional guidance in this matter."

Ortega testified at Murray's trial about his concerns about Jackson's frail condition and missed rehearsals. It resulted in a meeting six days before Jackson's death in which Murray assured the promoters he would have Jackson ready for rehearsals that next week.

An e-mail from Phillips after that meeting said he had confidence in Murray "who I am gaining immense respect for as I get to deal with him more."

"This doctor is extremely successful (we check everyone out) and does not need this gig, so he (is) totally unbiased and ethical," Phillips' e-mail said.

A wrongful-death lawsuit, filed by Jackson's mother and his three children, contends that AEG contributed to the pop star's death by pressuring him to prepare even though the promoters knew he was in a weak condition and by its hiring and supervision of Dr. Murray.

"Defendants did not hire Dr. Murray nor were they responsible for the death of Michael Jackson," AEG lawyer Putnam told CNN last week.

AEG's lawyer accused Katherine Jackson, the children and their lawyers of leaking the e-mails to a reporter, in violation of a court order, despite a claim of responsibility by someone else.

Howard Mann, who partnered with Katherine Jackson on a book about her family, acknowledged to CNN last week that he gave the documents to Times reporter Harriet Ryan.

Mann was involved in a bitter copyright dispute concerning that book with Jackson's estate at the time he gave the reporter the documents, but the lawsuit was settled last week.

Mann said he obtained the documents from various sources, but none of them came from the Jacksons or their lawyers. Some of the documents were part of discovery in other cases, including the criminal trial of Murray, he said.

AEG lawyer Marvin Putnam, who said Tuesday that he had "unequivocal evidence" showing that Michael Jackson's mother and her lawyers leaked the e-mails, has asked the judge in the wrongful-death suit to punish Katherine Jackson with fines and exclude the e-mails as evidence in the case.
"The documents released to the press were given to Mrs. Jackson and her attorneys -- and to no one else -- confidentially in discovery and subject to a court order," Putnam said Tuesday.

On Thursday, he called it "convenient that Howard Mann -- a longtime business partner of the Jackson family -- has come forward in this fashion."

AEG served a subpoena on Mann, ordering him to testify under oath about the source of the e-mails, on Friday, Putnam said.

"Whether these documents were leaked through an intermediary or directly by Mrs. Jackson and her counsel, this remains an egregious violation of the court's order requiring immediate sanctions and an investigation," the AEG lawyer said.

Putnam accused Jackson and her lawyers of leaking the documents -- despite that their "publication hurts her son's memory and her grandchildren more than anyone else" -- because they "know they cannot win on the law and are losing control over the case."

"After months of discovery, plaintiffs now know what we have known all along -- there is nothing to support their claims," the AEG lawyer said.

Jackson lawyer Kevin Boyle said the admission by Mann that he was the source of the e-mails should settle the matter.

"He (Mann) definitely never received any documents from Katherine, Prince, Paris, or Blanket Jackson, nor from their lawyers in the wrongful death suit against AEG," said Jackson lawyer Kevin Boyle. Prince, Paris and Blanket Jackson are Michael Jackson's children.

Boyle criticized AEG's lawyers for their haste in pointing the finger at the Jacksons.

"AEG made these accusations against the Jackson family and their lawyers apparently without doing even the most rudimentary investigation," Boyle said. "We are further disturbed that the motion for sanctions filed by AEG was given to the press before it was served on Katherine Jackson or her counsel."

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live.. Case Dropped 10 Sept 2012
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2012, 08:45:13 PM »
http://www.tmz.com/2012/09/11/michael-jackson-aeg-insurance-claim-lloyds-of-london-this-is-it/

AEG Drops $17.5 Mil Insurance Claim
9/11/2012 7:25 AM PDT BY TMZ STAFF


The concert promoter behind Michael Jackson's ill-fated "This Is It" tour has dropped its claim to collect on a $17.5 million insurance policy for the singer ... after the insurance company claimed AEG hid the extent of MJ's extensive drug and health issues.

AEG announced the move last night ... claiming the company has been contemplating the decision for months and it has nothing to do with the discovery of new emails that show AEG had doubts about MJ's health around the time the company applied for the insurance policy.

FYI -- the insurance company, Lloyds of London, had sued both AEG and Michael Jackson LLC in the wake of MJ's death to cancel out the policy. L.O.L. has claimed AEG and MJ were not forthright about the singer's drug addiction and failing health at the time they applied for the policy.

Now, a rep for Lloyds tells CNN ... "In exchange for AEG withdrawing its insurance claim, underwriters agreed to dismiss AEG from the case and to waive any costs recoverable from AEG."

Lloyds says it's NOT dropping the case against Michael Jackson LLC -- explaining they will press on seeking "rescission of the policy due to nondisclosures of Michael Jackson's prior drug use."

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Re: Insurance Company Lloyd's of London V AEG Live.. Case Dropped 10 Sept 2012
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2012, 08:48:32 PM »
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/09/11/entertainment-us-michaeljackson-idUSBRE88A1DE20120911

AEG dropping insurance claim over Michael Jackson death
By Alex Dobuzinskis
LOS ANGELES | Tue Sep 11, 2012 4:49pm EDT


(Reuters) - Michael Jackson's former concert promoter AEG Live is withdrawing a $17.5 million insurance claim in the 2009 death of the pop star amid revelations in leaked emails that show company executives were concerned about his stability ahead of his planned London comeback tour.

Attorneys involved in the case denied on Tuesday that AEG Live's move was related to the publication of the leaked emails by the Los Angeles Times on September 2.

Jackson died in June 2009 at age 50 from an overdose of the powerful anesthetic propofol and sedatives. Last year, a Los Angeles jury convicted the "Thriller" singer's physician, Conrad Murray, of involuntary manslaughter, but heard that Jackson was taking a cocktail of sleep aids and prescription medications.

AEG Live, the concert division of privately-held Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), had filed a claim seeking a $17.5 million insurance payment from Lloyd's of London for losses they incurred in up-front costs for Jackson's "This Is It" sell-out shows that were to start in London in July 2009.

Lloyd's later filed a lawsuit against AEG Live in Los Angeles Superior Court, seeking a declaration that the insurance company did not owe the money.

Marvin Putnam, an attorney for AEG, said the company no longer needed the $17.5 million because it was reimbursed by the Jackson estate for its concert-related losses and that it informed Lloyd's in June that it was withdrawing its claim.

Attorneys in the case told a judge on Monday that as a result they expected AEG Live to be dropped from the case, Putnam said. That has not yet officially happened, he said.

The insurance dispute is one of two major court cases stemming from Jackson's death.

The other is a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the "Thriller" singer's mother, Katherine Jackson, against AEG Live in which she accuses the company of being responsible for medical decisions made by Murray. That case is scheduled for trial next year.

The Los Angeles Times on September 2 published portions of emails between AEG Live executives about Jackson and his wellbeing. In one email from March 2009, sent when the singer was in London to announce the concerts, Randy Phillips, chief executive concert division AEG Live, despaired about the singer's condition.

"MJ is locked in his room drunk and despondent," Phillips said in the email, according to the Los Angeles Times. "I trying to sober him up."

While that email led to speculation that AEG Live knew about problems with Jackson while it was firming up its insurance policy with Lloyd's, Putnam said AEG's move to drop its insurance claim has "nothing to do with the recent leak" of documents containing the emails.

Attorneys for AEG have said they suspect the emails were leaked from material shared between the two sides in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by Katherine Jackson.

"We are standing by AEG's lawyers comments that the withdrawal of the claim was not related to the leaked emails," said Paul Schriffer, an attorney for the underwriters at Lloyd's of London.